3026
3026
An American Silver Art Nouveau Two-Handled Punch Bowl And Matching Ladle, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, Retailed By Spaulding & Co., Chicago, 1901 and 1902
Estimate
50,00070,000
JUMP TO LOT
3026
An American Silver Art Nouveau Two-Handled Punch Bowl And Matching Ladle, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, Retailed By Spaulding & Co., Chicago, 1901 and 1902
Estimate
50,00070,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Iris Schwartz Collection of American Silver

|
New York

An American Silver Art Nouveau Two-Handled Punch Bowl And Matching Ladle, Martelé, Gorham Mfg. Co., Providence, RI, Retailed By Spaulding & Co., Chicago, 1901 and 1902
the punch bowl of bombé circular form on pedestal foot chased with flower buds, the body chase with trailing flowers and nymphs with flowing hair, forked scrolled handles springing from foliage and chased with whiplash scrolls, gilt interior, the ladle with shaped bowl, the shaped handle decorated with flowers and terminating with a female mask
bowl marked on base and coded ANO, also scratched C F CURTIS, ladle marked on stem, coded CKT, also scratched with CFC
length over handles 20in., length of ladel 16 1/4 in.
50.8cm, 41.3cm
221oz 12dwt
6892g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sold, Sotheby's, New York, 17-18 June 1997, lots 49 and 50

Literature

Illustrated in L.J. Pristo Martelé: Gorham's Nouveau Art Silver, Phoenix Publishing Group Book, 2002, p. 107.

Catalogue Note

The "C.F. Curtis" on this piece is almost certainly for Midwestern millionaire Charles F. Curtis (b. 1846), founder of the first ready-made door and window factory.  Born poor in Illinois, C.F. moved to Clinton, Iowa and became owner of a millwork firm, bringing his brother in to help.  They were the first to glaze windows in the mill, rather than the builder having to assemble sashes, glass, putty, etc. and finish on site.  By 1877 the plant produced 50,000 doors, 90,000 windows, and over 18,000 blinds annually.  Branch plants, warehouses, and suppliers were added until the organization encompassed six individual corporations by the early 20th century, serving 14 Midwestern states.  C.F. Curtis himself died in 1915.

According to Pristo's table of Martelé costings, the punch bowl was completed on December 2, 1901 and was chased by David Wilmot.  It took him 285 hours to chase, and cost $800.00.  The ladle, which is marked CKT was  completed March 3, 1902, and again it took David Wilmont required nine hours of chasing, and had a net factory cost $52.00.  Wilmot was one of Gorham's most valued chasers, earning $32 per week and second only to Robert Bain.

The Iris Schwartz Collection of American Silver

|
New York