281
281

PROPERTY FROM THE LANIER COLLECTION

A YOGINI HOLDING A FAN
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
281

PROPERTY FROM THE LANIER COLLECTION

A YOGINI HOLDING A FAN
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 25,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art Including Property from The Cleveland Museum of Art

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New York

A YOGINI HOLDING A FAN
Opaque watercolor heightened with gold on paper
image: 5¼ by 6¾ in. (12.7 by 15.2 cm)
folio: 8¾ by 6¾ in. (20.3 by 15.2 cm)
India, Deccan, Bijapur, circa 1610 -1620
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Provenance

Acquired 1990

Catalogue Note

A mysterious yogini holds a large gold chevron-design fan, encircling her head like a halo.  Her hair is pulled back behind her into an oval topknot and loosely cascades in thin curls down her shoulders.  She wears a transparent white muslin waistcoat over mauve gold-pattern paijamas.  A patchwork purple and gold shawl over one shoulder and multiple strands of pearls.  A small sheathed knife and amulets hang from her red belt.  She stands in isolation against a brilliant emerald- verdigris ground.

Mounted on a Nineteenth Century album folio with two foliate inner borders between ink and gold foil ruled lines.  Orange outer borders with gold scrolling flower and leaf designs.

Part Sufi or part Shaivite saint?  We do not know the identity of this lovely yogini who may have been a princess with her strands of pearls and ornaments - her gilt-edged fan set with jewels - but who now appears a renunciate and solitary in her pose.  It is her ethereal quality that mesmerizes us - she seems to stand haloed somewhere between heaven and earth.

This beautiful painting represents the discovery of a previously unrecorded depiction of a Yogini from early Seventeenth Century Bijapur.  It may be attributable to the Mughal and Persian-trained Deccani artist Farrukh Husain (also known as Farrukh Beg) based upon similarities to other works inscribed or attributed to him.  A painting attributed to him, in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, depicts a "Groom Calming His  Horse" (M. Zebrowski, Deccani Painting, London, 1983, pp. 98-99) which shares its glowing emerald-green shaded ground, superbly rendered figure types with oval shaped heads and delicate facial shading.  A related painting "Saraswati Plays on a Vina" in the City Palace Museum Jaipur bears an inscription: "humble Farrukh Husain painter of Ibrahim 'Adil-Shah" and depicts a yogini-like female holding a vina.  Datable to circa 1604 it also shows an oval head and shaded face, with sections of a similarly shaded emerald green color (N. Haidar and M. Sardar, Sultans of the South: Arts of India's Deccan Courts 1323-1687, New York, 2011 p. 34-37).  These two compositions contain complex landscape and architectural elements - unlike our own yogini depicted against a flat green ground - but the meticulous detail and mysterious air of the works are comparable.

Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art Including Property from The Cleveland Museum of Art

|
New York