257
257

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EAST COAST COLLECTION

A BRONZE FIGURE OF SHIVA  South India, Vijayanagar period, 14th Century
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
257

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EAST COAST COLLECTION

A BRONZE FIGURE OF SHIVA  South India, Vijayanagar period, 14th Century
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art Including Property from The Cleveland Museum of Art

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New York

A BRONZE FIGURE OF SHIVA  South India, Vijayanagar period, 14th Century

Provenance

Sotheby's Parke Bernet, New York, 26 October 1974, lot 37.

Catalogue Note

The large elegantly modeled sculpture depicting the Lord standing in slight contrapposto atop a lotus face upon a raised plinth. He is richly ornamented with multiple necklaces, armbands and an elaborate jeweled girdle fashioned in the form of a kirttimukha. His hips are framed by the swaying sash ties of his short veshti. His face with its slight smile bears an enigmatic expression. His tall jata is ornamented with a jeweled tiara. A crescent moon peeps out of his matted coils on the upper right while a snake hood rests subtly on the left. Shiva’s primary hands which would have held either a vina or a bow and arrow are intact. The secondary hands, now missing, would have held his characteristic attributes  - a leaping antelope and a battle-axe - signifying his ascendancy over man and beast and emphasizing his war-like qualities. Flower blossoms caress his broad shoulders.

Images bearing this iconography have been variously identified as Vinadhara (Player of the Vina) or as Tripuravijaya (Destroyer of three cities). This is because the identifying attributes in the primary hands of the image that would have been separately fashioned and inserted, are now missing. In his form as Vinadhara Dakshinamurti Shiva displays his great yogic powers since mastery over vocal and instrumental music in the Indian Classical tradition is closely linked with control over breath and ultimately mind. As Tripuravijaya – a form that gained much vogue during the late Chola period – Shiva radiates unlimited power for in this form he reduces three cities inhabited by demons to ashes with one flaming arrow. Most importantly, whether as a great yogi or as a great warrior Shiva reminds his devotees of his Omniscience.

For a much earlier but similarly large and sinuously modeled sculpture of Tripuravijaya with consort in the Cleveland Museum of Art collection, see V. Dehejia et al., The Sensuous and the Sacred: Chola Bronzes from South India, New York, 2003, cat. 5, pp. 106-107. The slender proportions, elaborate ornamentation and tall jatamukuta are reminiscent of the present image.

Indian, Himalayan & Southeast Asian Works of Art Including Property from The Cleveland Museum of Art

|
New York