416
416
Georges Braque
NATURE MORTE AU POISSON ET CITRONS
Estimate
300,000400,000
JUMP TO LOT
416
Georges Braque
NATURE MORTE AU POISSON ET CITRONS
Estimate
300,000400,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Georges Braque
1882 - 1963
NATURE MORTE AU POISSON ET CITRONS
Signed G Braque (lower left)
Oil and sand on canvas
12 1/4 by 25 5/8 in.
31.1 by 65.1 cm
Painted in 1943.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris
M. Knoedler & Co., New York
Private Collection, Japan (acquired by 1960)
Fanny de Margoulies Rosenak, New York
Private Collection, Maryland
Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2008

Exhibited

Tokyo, Le Journal Yomiuri, Georges Braque, 1952, no. 13

Literature

Jean Grenier, Braque, Peinture 1909-1947, Paris, 1948, illustrated on the cover
Galerie Maeght, ed., Catalogue de l'oeuvre de Georges Braque, peintures 1942-1947, Paris, 1960, no. 49, illustrated n.p.

Catalogue Note

The still life was a subject to which Braque returned consistently throughout his long and productive career. In every phase, beginning with the Fauve period and culminating in the majestic interiors of his last years, Braque found the arrangement of a limited number of objects on a table top or in an interior to be the most appropriate subject for his investigations of the formal and tactile qualities of painting. His artistic faculties and courageous vision were ideally suited for the genre, and it has been written: "Nobody else succeeded as [Braque] did in transforming a table covered with objects into a mental space, a cerebral as well as a visual stimulus. Braque's 'pedestal tables' reflect the subjectivity of the painter as much as the objectivity of an utterly ordinary environment" (Isabelle Monod-Fontaine, "Georges Braque's Still Lives" in Georges Braque: Order & Emotion, Andros, 2003, p. 19).

When the Germans occupied France in 1940, Braque was forced to flee, initially to the Limoges region and later to the Pyrenees, and when he returned to Paris he withdrew to his studio and lived in self-isolation through the remainder of the war. He was remarkably productive during this period, though his resulting output is striking in its austerity and its focus on basic foods, for example loaves of bread or bowls of fruit, which underscore the severe deprivation he experienced. 

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York