369
369

PROPERTY FROM THE FORMER GABRIEL-ALBERT AURIER COLLECTION

Émile Bernard
L'ORCHESTRE
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT
369

PROPERTY FROM THE FORMER GABRIEL-ALBERT AURIER COLLECTION

Émile Bernard
L'ORCHESTRE
Estimate
100,000150,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Émile Bernard
1868 - 1941
L'ORCHESTRE
Oil on canvas
16 1/8 by 12 3/4 in.
41 by 32.3 cm
Painted circa 1887.
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Lucrezia Argyropoulos-Recchi has kindly confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Gabriel-Albert Aurier, Paris (acquired directly from the artist before 1892)
Private Collection, France (by descent from the above and sold: Cornette de Saint-Cyr, Paris, December 10, 2016, lot 21)
Acquired at the above sale 

Exhibited

Mannheim, Stadtische Kunsthalle & Amsterdam, Van Gogh Museum, Émile Bernard, a Pioneer of Modern Art, 1990, no. 38

Literature

Jean-Jacques Luthi, Émile Bernard, Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre peint, Paris, 1982, no. 62, illustrated p. 14
Jean-Jacques Luthi & Armand Israël, Émile Bernard, Sa vie, son oeuvre, catalogue raisonné, Paris, 2014, no. 78, illustrated p. 149

Catalogue Note

From 1886 to 1887, when the present work was painted, the artist was at the forefront of a decorative, anti-naturalistic style called Cloisonnism, characterized by flattened areas of pure color, circumscribed by strong black outlines, with its visual suggestion of the enameled metalwork known as cloisonné. Vincent van Gogh, a close friend by the mid-1880s, admired Bernard's Cloisonnist portraits and the two artists began a lively correspondence. Through his friendship with van Gogh, Bernard was exposed to Japanese prints, which were similarly championed by both artists and their contemporaries for their flattened, frieze-like bands of color as well as their strong black outlines.

Bernard’s fascination with depicting scenes of modern, popular activities was shared with fellow artists Henri Toulouse-Lautrec and Louis Anquetin, and he focused almost exclusively on this theme between 1884 and 1889. As art historian and curator Mary Anne Stevens notes, “These years saw his search for a new visual vocabulary capable of dissociating art from its traditional direct linked with external nature, such as explorations of the worlds of cafés, brothels and music halls may have presented Bernard with a perfect conjunction of non-natural subjects and a cruder, increasingly non-naturalistic technique derived in large measure from Vincent van Gogh and from the early work of Cézanne” (Mary Anne Stevens, Emile Bernard 1868-1941: A Pioneer of Modern Art, Amsterdam, 1990, p. 172).

The present work was first owned by critic Albert Aurier, an avid collector of Symbolist art and close friend of Bernard and van Gogh and remained in the family's collection for more than 100 years.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York