354
354
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
ALLÉGORIE: LE PRINTEMPS DE LA VIE
Estimate
300,000400,000
JUMP TO LOT
354
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
ALLÉGORIE: LE PRINTEMPS DE LA VIE
Estimate
300,000400,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
1864 - 1901
ALLÉGORIE: LE PRINTEMPS DE LA VIE
Signed with the artist's monogram (lower left)
Oil on canvas
21 3/4 by 16 3/4 in.
55.5 by 42.3 cm
Painted in 1883. 
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Provenance

Private Collection, Geneva (and sold: Sotheby's, London, April 2, 1981, lot 307)
Private Collection, London (acquired at the above sale and sold: Christie's, New York, November 15, 1988, lot 8)
Private Collection, New York (and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 8, 1995, lot 158)
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Paris, Galerie Barthélémy, Toulouse-Lautrec, 1903, no. 4, illustrated in the catalogue
Chicago, Richard L. Feigen & Co., Six Centuries of Myth and Legend, 1988, no. 34

Literature

Maurice Joyant, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1864-1901, vol. I, Paris, 1926, p. 259; vol. II, pp. 6 & 40 
Paul de Lapparent, Toulouse-Lautrec, Paris, 1927, p. 15
Henri Perruchot, La Vie de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paris, 1958, p. 78
M.G. Dortu, Toulouse-Lautrec et son oeuvre, vol. II, New York, 1971, no. P.204, illustrated p. 89
Gale B. Murray, Toulouse-Lautrec, The Formative Years, Oxford, 1991, pp. 48 & 238

Catalogue Note

Born into an aristocratic French family in 1864, Toulouse-Lautrec spent much of his life rendering images of the Parisian demi-monde, revealing his genius for visually investigating the world of fin-de-siècle France. The present work is a strikingly rare allegorical painting executed at the beginning of the artist's career, demonstrating his compelling aptitude for art historical study. While radically different from his twilight nightlife studies, the present work displays the artist’s trademark experimentation with perspective and point of view. Though the work is academic and more traditional in style from his later works, the fighting tigers against the flattened background speak to the influence of Japonisme and the Japanese woodblock prints which were widely circulated in Paris and much admired by Édouard Manet, Édouard Vuillard and Vincent van Gogh throughout the period (see fig. 1).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York