353
353

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Rembrandt Bugatti
PETIT JAGUAR MARCHANT
Estimate
250,000350,000
JUMP TO LOT
353

PROPERTY OF A GENTLEMAN

Rembrandt Bugatti
PETIT JAGUAR MARCHANT
Estimate
250,000350,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Rembrandt Bugatti
1884 - 1916
PETIT JAGUAR MARCHANT
Inscribed R Bugatti, numbered (10) and stamped with the foundry mark A.A. Hebrard Cire Perdue

Bronze
Length: 15 1/2 in.
39.4 cm
Conceived circa 1911 and cast between 1911 and 1922 in a numbered edition of 10.
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This work is recorded in the archives of the Rembrandt Bugatti Conservatoire, Paris.

Provenance

Louis Comfort Tiffany, New York (acquired in 1922)
Private Collection, New York (and sold: Sotheby's, New York, June 7, 2002, lot 235)
S. Joel Schur, Connecticut (acquired at the above sale and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 3, 2010, lot 391)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Edward Horswell, Rembrandt Bugatti, Life in Sculpture, London, 2004, illustration of another cast pp. 198-99
Véronique Fromanger, Rembrandt Bugatti Sculpteur—Répertoire Monographique, Paris, 2009, no. 273, illustration of another cast p. 323
Véronique Fromanger, Une trajectoire foudroyante, Rembrandt Bugatti, sculpteur, répertoire monographique, Paris, 2016, no. 277, illustrated p. 357

Catalogue Note

Bugatti was unique among modern sculptors in focusing on depictions of wild animals. So fascinated was he by this subject that he worked primarily outdoors at the Jardin zoologique in Antwerp after moving to the city in 1907 so that he could study the nuances of animal behavior. He rendered his figures in plastiline, a typical Italian modeling clay, using strokes of his thumbs, and working with the Hébrard foundry with the aid of chief founder Albino Palazzolo, who cast the finished works in bronze.

 
In Petit jaguar marchant, Bugatti encapsulates the streamlined power and slinking, feline gait of the big cat in a whimsical yet entirely naturalistic composition. The artist's meticulous attention to the nuances of musculature and movement, as well as his infinitely subtler references to emotion and personality, underscores his respect and awe for the beast immortalized here. As the artist himself once stated, "I will work with all my strength to go as high as I am able. I hope and I believe that I will succeed in creating a work such as no other animal sculptor ancient or modern has achieved before" (quoted in Phillipe Dejean, Bugatti, Carlo-Rembrandt-Ettore-Jean, Paris, 1981, p. 141).


Louis Comfort Tiffany, arguably America's most famous designer, was a passionate admirer of Rembrandt Bugatti and once owned this very cast.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York