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Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Joan Miró
1893 - 1983
LE BANQUET
Signed Miró. (lower right); signed Miró and dated 23/9/54 (on the verso)
Watercolor over blackstone lithograph
16 1/2 by 25 1/2 in.
42 by 64.8 cm
Executed on September 23, 1954.
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ADOM has confirmed the authenticity of this work.

Provenance

Michel Tériade, Paris (acquired in 1966)
Private Collection, Florida (acquired from the above and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 11, 1999, lot 369)
Howard Russeck Fine Art, Palm Beach (acquired at the above sale)
Private Collection, New York (acquired from the above in 1999 and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 7, 2013, lot 332)
Acquired at the above sale

Literature

Alfred Jarry, Ubu Roi, Paris, 1966, illustrated n.p.
Miró, L'Oeuvre graphique (exhibition catalogue), Musée de l'art moderne, Paris & Fondation Gulbenkian, Lisbon, 1974, no. 473
Joan Texidor, Joan Miró: Lithographs 1964-1969, vol. III, Paris, 1977, nos. 463-65, illustrations of the printed black and white and color proofs p. 89
Patrick Cramer, Joan Miró: The Illustrated Books Catalogue Raisonné, Geneva, 1989, no. 107, illustration of a printed color proof p. 277
Ubu cent ans de règne (exhibition catalogue), Musée Galerie de la Seita, Paris, 1989, illustration of a printed color proof p. 42
Jacques Dupin, Miró, New York, 1993, the series discussed pp. 426-27

Catalogue Note

Executed in 1954, this work is one of a set of thirteen hand-colored presentation proofs from the collection of publisher Michel Tériade which Miró executed to illustrate Alfred Jarry's play Ubu Roi. The set was published by Tériade in 1966. The first in a trilogy of satirical works centered around the infamous character Ubu, the play Ubu Roi was considered one of the first theatrical Symbolist farces, mocking both art and civilization. Miró adhered closely to the text for artistic inspiration, and his illustrations are closer to stage sets than drawings: "Here, contrary to his usual practice, the artist illustrated the text as if he were staging the play, following it to the very letter" (Patrick Cramer, op. cit., p. 11).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York