255
255

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOHN FINNERAN, MARYLAND

Jean-Baptiste-Armand Guillaumin
LE ROCHER ROUGE À AGAY
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
255

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOHN FINNERAN, MARYLAND

Jean-Baptiste-Armand Guillaumin
LE ROCHER ROUGE À AGAY
Estimate
80,000120,000
LOT SOLD. 93,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Jean-Baptiste-Armand Guillaumin
1841 - 1927
LE ROCHER ROUGE À AGAY
Signed Guillaumin (lower right)
Oil on canvas
28 7/8 by 36 1/4 in.
73.2 by 92 cm
Painted circa 1900. 
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Provenance

Durand-Ruel, Paris
Private Collection, Paris (and sold: Tajan, Paris, June 12, 2003, lot 15)
Waterhouse & Dodd, London (acquired at the above sale)
Galerie L’Enfant, Washington, D.C.
Acquired from the above in 2006

Literature

Georges Serret & Dominique Fabiani, Armand Guillaumin, Catalogue raisonné de l'oeuvre peint, Paris, 1971, no. 454, illustrated n.p.

Catalogue Note

Guillaumin was a founding member of the Impressionist movement as well as its longest-surviving proponent. He studied alongside Cézanne and met Pissarro at the Académie Suisse in 1866; he would work alongside them painting en plein air in Pontoise and Auvers-sur-Oise and would later exhibit with them at the First Impressionist Exhibition in 1874. His rich paintings of the bucolic French landscape as well as the bustling Paris cityscape gained him much praise and many great accolades throughout his career, and they proved to be of particular interest to Gauguin as well as Theo and Vincent van Gogh.

In 1889 Vincent van Gogh wrote of Guillaumin's landscapes in a letter to his sister: "You must feel the whole of a country—isn't that what distinguishes a Cézanne from anything else? And Guillaumin, whom you cite, he has so much style and such a personal manner of drawing. What you say of Guillaumin is very true, he has found one true thing and contents himself with what he has found, without going off at random after divergent things, and in that way he will keep straight, and become stronger..." (quoted in Christopher Gray, Armand Guillaumin, Chester, Connecticut, 1972, p. 41). While van Gogh clearly admired Guillaumin, the present work is equally indebted to the Post-Impressionist experimentations with color which van Gogh himself pioneered, and which fellow artists such as Valtat and Bonnard embraced (see fig. 1).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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