205
205

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
ANÉMÔNES
Estimate
350,000450,000
LOT SOLD. 492,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
205

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED NEW YORK PRIVATE COLLECTION

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
ANÉMÔNES
Estimate
350,000450,000
LOT SOLD. 492,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Pierre-Auguste Renoir
1841-1919
ANÉMÔNES
Signed with the initials AR (lower right)
Oil on canvas
9 3/4 by 18 1/8 in.
24.7 by 46 cm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

This work will be included in the catalogue critique being prepared by the Wildenstein Institute from the François Daulte, Durand-Ruel, Venturi, Vollard and Wildenstein archives.
This work will be included in the second supplement to the Catalogue raisonné des tableaux, pastels, dessins et aquarelles de Pierre-Auguste Renoir being prepared by Guy Patrice Dauberville and Floriane Dauberville, published by Bernheim-Jeune.

Provenance

Dr. Othmar & Valerie Häuptli-Baumann, Switzerland
Private Collection, Switzerland (by descent from the above and sold: Sotheby’s, London, June 25, 2002, lot 116)
Private Collection, Switzerland (acquired at the above sale)
Opera Gallery, Paris (acquired from the above)
Acquired from the above in 2004

Exhibited

Aarau, Switzerland, Aargauer Kunsthaus (on loan)

Catalogue Note

Throughout his long and productive career, Renoir consistently returned to floral compositions. The subject provided endless opportunity for technical experimentation, and his flower paintings show the same exuberant brushwork and intuitive understanding of color and movement that define his best portraits and landscapes. As was the case for many of the Impressionist painters, Renoir did not need to rely on the trompe l'oeil techniques that had been utilized by artists for centuries in order to render the flowers so convincingly. Instead, he drew upon his own creative ingenuity and his initial impressions of the image, rendering it with extraordinary freshness. Few artists of his generation would approach this subject with the richness and sensitivity that is demonstrated in his floral pictures. Renoir once said of his flower pictures: "What seems to me most significant about our movement [Impressionism] is that we have freed painting from the importance of the subject. I am at liberty to paint flowers and call them flowers, without their needing to tell a story" (quoted in Peter Mitchell, European Flower Painters, London, 1973, pp. 211-12).

This lush and vibrant painting is a particularly charming example of Renoir’s floral paintings. Anémônes achieves a wonderful spontaneity through a combination of free, looser brushstrokes and the interplay of light and color. The thick impasto and warm palette captures the blooming flowers’ delicacy, and Renoir spoke of how he strove for an improvisatory effect in paintings of this kind: "It mustn’t reek of the model—and yet one should be able to get the feel of nature in it" (quoted in François Fosca, Renoir: His Life and Work, London, 1961, p. 263).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York