170
170

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Egon Schiele
LIEGENDES MÄDCHEN MIT SCHWARZEN STRÜMPFEN (RECLINING GIRL WITH BLACK STOCKING)
Estimate
300,000500,000
JUMP TO LOT
170

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE COLLECTION

Egon Schiele
LIEGENDES MÄDCHEN MIT SCHWARZEN STRÜMPFEN (RECLINING GIRL WITH BLACK STOCKING)
Estimate
300,000500,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Egon Schiele
1890 - 1918
LIEGENDES MÄDCHEN MIT SCHWARZEN STRÜMPFEN (RECLINING GIRL WITH BLACK STOCKING)
Signed Egon Schiele and dated 1913. (center right); numbered No. 921 by another hand (lower left)
Watercolor and pencil on paper
12 1/4 by 19 in.
31.1 by 48.3 cm
Executed in 1913.
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Provenance

Otto Kallir, Vienna 
Vita Maria Künstler, Vienna 
Galerie Würthe, Vienna
Wolfgang Fischer (Fischer Fine Art, Ltd.), London
Anthony Abroms, Dallas (and sold: Sotheby's, New York, November 12, 1988, lot 158)
Acquired at the above sale 

Exhibited

New York, Galerie St. Etienne, Schiele, 1957, no. 17
New York, Galerie St. Etienne, Schiele, 1961, no. 28
New York, Galerie St. Etienne, Schiele, 1965, no. 46

Literature

Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: The Complete Works, New York, 1990, no. 1241, illustrated p. 493
Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: The Complete Works, Expanded Edition, New York, 1998, no. 1241, illustrated p. 493
Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele: Oeuvre complet, Nouvelle édition revue et augmentée, Paris, 2001, no. 1241, illustrated p. 493 (titled Girl with Black Stocking and Shoe)

Catalogue Note

Schiele may be counted among the most influential draftsmen of the modern movement, his contour drawings being the most readily identifiable of the entire Expressionist school. As Jane Kallir writes, “Like the late medieval German artists Hans Holbein and Albrecht Durer—with whom he merits comparison—Schiele was a consummate master of line. Early on, he learned to work fast. His hated master at the academy, Christian Griepenkerl, gave timed exercises, and Schiele of his own volition often drew with a stopwatch in hand. His entire life was a search for the perfect line: the line that hits the target every time; the line that knows no eraser. This, however, does not mean that Schiele’s approach was doctrinaire or monolithic. Flexibility and spontaneity were essential to his quest. His contours could be flowing and elegant in the Jugendstil manner, primitive in the Expressionistic mode, clipped and jagged, spare and sensual, or intertwined with curlicues and scarlike hatchings. The best of Schiele’s drawings demonstrate a perfect accord among the artist’s hand, his perceptions of his subject, and the subject’s physical appearance” (Jane Kallir, Egon Schiele (exhibition catalogue), National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1994, p. 14).

1913 marked Schiele's spiritual departure from a young adulthood occupied by inner turmoil and the anxiety of sexual awakening. As he stepped out of his vice and into a new maturity, his work, too, traded its blatant eroticism for a new tenderness, its voyeurism for an attentive intimacy. Gently inching away from his exploitation of the angular body's dramatic expressivity, the present work frames what Kallir describes as Schiele's rendering of "rounder, more wholesome shapes...[that] differ in their ability to evoke an underlying structure of bone and muscle" (Jane Kallir, op. cit., p. 490).

The present lot belonged to the art dealer Otto Nirenstein, who later took the name of Kallir. In 1923, Kallir would open the Neue Galerie with an exhibition of Schiele's paintings and later publish the first catalogue raisonné of his works in 1930. Threatened by the law against "degenerated art" in 1938, Liegendes Mädchen mit Schwarzen Strümpfen was then owned by Vita Maria Künstler who took over the Neue Galerie when Kallir emigrated to the United States. 

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