163
163
Wassily Kandinsky
DIE ROSEN (ROSES)
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 732,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
163
Wassily Kandinsky
DIE ROSEN (ROSES)
Estimate
600,000800,000
LOT SOLD. 732,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Wassily Kandinsky
1866 - 1944
DIE ROSEN (ROSES)
Signed Kandinsky. (lower left); signed Kandinsky, inscribed -Die Rosen (Tempera) "Grande mère et petite fille" and numbered No. 100 (on the verso
Gouache on board
22 3/4 by 31 in.
57.7 by 78.4 cm
Executed in early 1905. 
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Galerie Der Sturm (Herwarth Walden), Berlin
Gummesons Konsthandel, Stockholm (acquired in 1916)
Carl Frisk, Stockholm
Private Collection, Stockholm (by descent from the above)
Private Collection, France
Sale: Christie's, London, November 29, 1993, lot 26
Acquired at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Paris, Grand Palais des Champs-Élysées, Salon d'Automne, 1905, no. 818 (titled La Grande mère et petite fille
Krefeld, Kaiser-Wilhelm Museum, 1906 (according to the artist's handlist)
Berlin, Secession Ausstellunghaus XI, Elfte Ausstellung der Berliner Secession, 1906, no. 146, illustrated in color in the catalogue
Berlin, Galerie Der Sturm & traveling, Kandinsky Kollektiv-Ausstellung, 1912, no. 56, illustrated in color in the catalogue
Stockholm, Gummesons Konstgalleriet & Christiana (Oslo), C. W. Blomquist, Vassily Kandinsky, 1916, no. 14 

Literature

The Artist's Handlist, Coloured Drawings, listed as 100, Die Rosen, Grande mère et petite fille
G.B. Rossi, "Arte e Artisti: Kandinsky" in Italia Industriale e Artistica, July/August 1905, illustrated p. 4 
Galerie Der Sturm, Sturm Album, Kandinsky, 1901-13, 1913, illustrated p. 23
Will Grohmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Paris, 1930, p. 24
Will Grohmann, Wassily Kandinsky, Life and Work, New York, 1958, p. 343
Hans Konrad Roethel, Kandinsky. Das Graphische Werk, Cologne, 1970,  pp. 28-29
Donald E. Gordon, Modern Art Exhibitions 1900-1916, vol. II, Munich, 1974, pp. 138 & 158
Jonathan D. Fineberg, Kandinsky in Paris 1906-7, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1984, pp. 51 & 53
Kandinsky and Sweden (exhibition catalogue), Konstahall, Malmo, 1989, illustrated p. 73
Vivian Endicott Barnett, Kandinsky, Catalogue Raisonné of the Watercolours, 1900-1921, vol. I, London, 1992, no. 190, illustrated p. 178 & in color p. 171

Catalogue Note

Die Rosen is number 100 in the 1901-07 series Kandinsky referred to as "colored drawings," many of which are lost; of the 132 which Kandinsky executed, only forty remain in museums and private collections. Kandinsky’s ethnographic impulse is strong in these works, in which he predominantly depicts courtly costumes from Biedermeier Germany, village life, and chivalrous scenes in medieval Russia and Germany. Kandinsky’s abiding interest in the decorative components of color, rhythmical line and pattern are evident throughout the series, particularly in his use of tinted cardboard as both painterly tool and medium.

As Vivian Endicott Barnett notes, "The colored drawings...reflect Munich's Jugendstil environment as well as Art Nouveau tendencies in general, as can be seen in the stylization, the relative lack of perspectival depth, the tendency towards the decorative, an interest in applied and decorative arts and a heightened interest in folk art... Another characteristic of the colored drawings is the tendency to stylize the scenery. The figures are rendered as types and not as recognizable individuals. In the colored drawings Kandinsky did not attempt realistic portraiture of a naturalistic representation of landscape; it was the spiritual meaning of the representation which was important to him" (Vivian Endicott Barnett, op. cit., p. 14).

In this 1905 work one can already see Kandinsky’s move towards abstraction via his depiction of the windblown trees, as well as his compositional choices conveying his association of a circle with concepts of the romantic and lyrical, which he had explored more greatly during his Bauhaus period of 1922 to 1933. To Kandinsky, the romantic is a constant, timeless value: “where are the boundaries between the lyric and the romantic? The circle, that I have used so much recently can often be characterized in no other way than as romantic” (quoted in Peg Weiss, Kandinsky in Munich: The Formative Jugendstil Years, Princeton, 1979, p. 129).

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