159
159

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED COLLECTION

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
BLUMENVASE (STILL LIFE WITH FLOWERS)
Estimate
300,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 372,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
159

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED COLLECTION

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
BLUMENVASE (STILL LIFE WITH FLOWERS)
Estimate
300,000500,000
LOT SOLD. 372,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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Ernst Ludwig Kirchner
1880 - 1938
BLUMENVASE (STILL LIFE WITH FLOWERS)
Signed E L Kirchner. (center right)
Oil on canvas
29 5/8 by 25 7/8 in.
75.2 by 66.7 cm
Painted in 1928.
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This work is listed in the Ernst Ludwig Kirchner archives, Wichtrach/Bern.

Provenance

Estate of the artist
Sale: Stuttgarter Kunstkabinett, Stuttgart, November 26, 1955, lot 1306
Dalzell Hatfield Galleries, Los Angeles (acquired at the above sale)
Acquired from the above in 1968

Exhibited

Bern, Kunstmuseum, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, 1933, no. 85
Hamburg, Kunstverein; Hannover, Kestner-Gesellschaft & Bremen, Kunsthalle, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner: Werke aus dem Nachlass zum ersten Male in Deutschland aus Anlass seines 70. Geburtstages, 1950-51, no. 28
Los Angeles, Dalzell Hatfield Galleries, The German Expressionists, 1958, n.n., illustrated in the catalogue

Literature

Werner Schmalenbach, "Ernst Ludwig Kirchner: Ansprache gehalten anlässlich der Eröffnung der Kirchner-Ausstellung in der Galerie d'Art Moderne, Basel, Oktober 1947" in Werk, Germany, 1948, illustrated p. 23
Donald E. Gordon, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1968, no. 910, illustrated p. 398

Catalogue Note

Painted in 1928, Blumenvase is an exceptional example of Kirchner's mature post-war style. By 1924 Kirchner had moved permanently to the Wildboden area of Switzerland at the mouth of the Sertig Valley and was deeply inspired by the surrounding countryside. During this period his style transformed and he began to express his ideas in a more abstract manner, seeing the canvas as a two-dimensional arena for decoration. In Blumenvase, geometric ornamentation is introduced without a representational purpose, such as in the lower left corner, and color planes are freed of their outlines in order to unify the space. The elements of a still life are decoratively composed and rendered in deep blue and yellow hues. Indeed, Kirchner was well aware of other avant-garde artistic developments around Europe, even in the relative seclusion of the mountainous Swiss countryside. In 1925 he visited an exhibition of contemporary art in Zurich that featured works by his fellow Brücke members as well as Picasso and Braque. He left with a favorable impression of their work, stating: “The best and most unique is certainly Picasso, he strives for form in the old paintings as in the new ones” (quoted in David E. Gordon, op. cit., p. 132). Gordon further discusses the artist's transformation of style: “One of the unexpected aspects of the abstract style…is its potential for expressional variation; color especially becomes capable of conveying various moods... In general, the style with which he concluded the 1920s achieves a content of subtly lyrical evocation appropriate to the abstract pictorial means employed” (ibid., p. 136).

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