127
127

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Verner Thomé
PLAYING CHILDREN
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
127

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Verner Thomé
PLAYING CHILDREN
Estimate
30,00050,000
LOT SOLD. 125,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York

Verner Thomé
1878 - 1953
PLAYING CHILDREN
Signed V. Thomé and dated 1913 (lower right)
Oil on canvas
55 by 90 1/2 in.
140 by 230 cm
Painted in 1913.
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Provenance

Ivar Hörhammer, Helsinki (acquired directly from the artist in 1913)
Hörhammer Collection, Sweden (by descent from the above)
Peter Nahum at the Leicester Galleries, London (acquired from the above in 2004)
Acquired from the above

Exhibited

Oslo, Munch Museum, Livskraft, Vitalismen som kunstnerisk impuls 1900-1930, 2006, no. 154, illustrated in the catalogue

Catalogue Note

Thome’s Playing Children is an essential contribution to the Vitalist movement of the early twentieth century, and a crucial painting in the artist’s oeuvre, executed at the peak of his artistic development. Vitalism was a German-Scandinavian movement which incorporated Nietzsche's philosophy of the “eternal lust for life” and the biological theories of Hans Driesch and Ernst Haeckel. Artists were encouraged to explore the theme of human perfection in relation to nature. Vitalism portrayed a positivistic view of life based on the Nietzschean model. Deriving from the great tradition of figure painting, the male nude became a symbol of power, juxtaposed with the outdoor landscape and the forces of nature.

The subject of Playing Children was first commissioned by the Swedish Primary School in Helsinki, where a similar interpretation, dated 1912, exists as a mural. A second version was commissioned by the Central Railway Station in Helsinki in 1913, which most likely is the present painting. It was acquired by the artist’s patron, Ivar Hörhammer, directly from the artist, soon after completion. The painting remained in the Hörhammer family until it was acquired by the present owner in 2004.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

|
New York