119
119

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT CANADIAN COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
ÈVE À LA POMME
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
119

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT CANADIAN COLLECTION

Aristide Maillol
ÈVE À LA POMME
Estimate
100,000150,000
LOT SOLD. 118,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York

Aristide Maillol
1861 - 1944
ÈVE À LA POMME
Inscribed Aristide Maillol, numbered 5/6 and stamped with the foundry mark C. Valsuani, Cire Perdue
Bronze
Height: 23 in.
58.4 cm
Conceived in 1899 and cast in a numbered edition of 6 plus 2 artist's proofs; this example cast between 1973-74.
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This work will be included in the forthcoming Catalogue raisonné de l’oeuvre d’Aristide Maillol currently being prepared under the supervision of Olivier Lorquin.

Provenance

Galería Conkright, Caracas
Private Collection, Caracas
Luhring, Augustine & Hodes Gallery, New York
Private Collection, Canada (acquired from the above in July 1985)
Thence by descent

Literature

John Rewald, Maillol, New York, 1939, illustration of another cast pl. 76
Aristide Maillol (exhibition catalogue), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1975-76, no. 24, illustration of another cast p. 50
Waldemar George, Aristide Maillol, Neuchâtel, 1977, no. 64, illustration of another cast p. 64
Bertrand Lorquin, Maillol, London, 1995, illustration of another cast p. 39

Catalogue Note

By the late 1890s, when the present work was conceived, Maillol had returned to sculpture after a period of time devoted entirely to painting. He modeled both clothed and nude female figures in clay and terracotta, yielding detail to simplification of form and surface. He imbued his young female models with a simple grace and charm, wonderfully captured in Ève à la pomme.

The present sculpture is the product of Maillol’s ongoing fascination with the static and serene art of the Egyptians, the mystery of Khmer sculpture and especially the primitivism of the Greek archaic period. Maillol would later comment: “I prefer the still primitive art of Olympus to that of the Parthenon... it is the most beautiful thing that I have seen; it is more beautiful than anything else in the world. It is an art of synthesis, a higher art than ours today, which seeks to represent the human flesh. If I had lived in the 6th century, I should have found happiness in working with those men” (quoted in John Rewald, op. cit., p. 17).

Ève à la pomme shows how quickly Maillol's conception of the figure matured, forging a style that would evolve with greater subtlety in later years, yet would always remain true to fundamental ideas of form and subject. As noted by Bernard Lorquin, “Eve holding the apple is clearly the most accomplished expression of this series of experiments and is remarkable for the way it combines classical sobriety with a very clean treatment of the figure” (Bertrand Lorquin, op. cit., p. 38). The figure is casually posed, fresh and immediate in appeal. Despite its title, the nude seems remarkably free of any negative conception that applied to Eve in fin de siècle painting and sculpture.

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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New York