354
354

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Gustav Klimt
FRITZA RIEDLER IM RÜSCHENKLEID (FRITZA RIEDLER IN A FRILLED DRESS)
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 28,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
354

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Gustav Klimt
FRITZA RIEDLER IM RÜSCHENKLEID (FRITZA RIEDLER IN A FRILLED DRESS)
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 28,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Gustav Klimt
1862 - 1918
FRITZA RIEDLER IM RÜSCHENKLEID (FRITZA RIEDLER IN A FRILLED DRESS)
charcoal on paper
44.8 by 31.5cm., 17 5/8 by 12 3/8 in.
Executed in 1904-05.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

This work will be included in the forthcoming supplement to the Klimt Catalogue raisonné  being prepared by Dr Marian Bisanz-Prakken.

Provenance

Sale: Neumeisters, Munich, 25th May 1991, lot 183
Purchased at the above sale by the family of the present owner

Catalogue Note

Gustav Klimt’s exquisite and ingenious representations of women have led him to become the most celebrated painter of the female portrait of the early 20th Century. Klimt’s portraiture was almost exclusively the product of commissions from female members of the Viennese high society and intimate images of his companion, the designer, Emilie Flöge. Klimt’s portraits were high in demand and helped to rapidly establish him in Vienna as the most successful artist of his day.

Presented over the following pages are three of Klimt’s preparatory studies for portraits of Fritza Riedler, Elisabeth Lederer and Miss Lieser. In multiple drawings Klimt experimented with slight variations of pose and composition in order to caption his sitter as distinctly as possible. The drawings are characterised by wonderfully fluid lines, brimming with vitality.

The fashion-conscious artist often incorporated extravagant patterns and geometric designs into his work and those who sat for his portraits, and may have been dressed in the current fashions, were often reimagined entirely to the artist’s own taste. Klimt appears to have used the sitter’s dress to add meaning. Whilst the frills on Fritza Riedler’s dress playfully underline the wearer’s femininity the close fitting dress of Elisabteh Lederer seems more suitable to showcase her petite stature and fragile complexion, whilst Miss Lieser’s patterned shawl appears to be wrapped around her shoulders protectively.

Marian Bisanz-Prakken observed: ‘The dialect of body language and gestures on the one hand, and the vitality of the clothing on the other hand thus became the hallmark of his portraiture’ (Marian Bisanz-Prakken ‘Klimts Studies for the Portrait Paintings’ in Tobias G. Natter & Gerbert Frodl (ed.), Klimt’s Women, p.199). And further: ‘The thoroughness with which Klimt approached his subject in preparatory studies might seem superficially academic and almost anachronistic. In actual fact, in each drawing, he took up the challenge anew to integrate the figure standing before him into the overall “world of the artist”. Within his unchanging, self-imposed limitations he sought a balance between emotional expression and a higher order. In other words, above and beyond the function of a preparatory study, each drawing took on the creed-like aspect of the urgent and the definitive’ (ibid., p. 204-205).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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