350
350

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Georges Braque
FRUITS, CRUCHE ET PIPE
JUMP TO LOT
350

PROPERTY FROM A PRIVATE EUROPEAN COLLECTION

Georges Braque
FRUITS, CRUCHE ET PIPE
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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London

Georges Braque
1882 - 1963
FRUITS, CRUCHE ET PIPE
signed G Braque (lower right)
oil on panel
42.5 by 59.5cm., 16 3/4 by 23 1/2 in.
Painted in 1924.
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Provenance

Mr & Mrs Cummins Catherwood, Pennsylvania
Galerie D. Benador, Geneva
Private Collection, Europe (acquired circa 1965; sale: Christie's, London, 25th June 2008, lot 469)
Purchased at the above sale by the present owner

Exhibited

Paris, Galerie Charpentier, Nature Mortes Françaises, 1951
Philadelphia, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia Collects 20th Century, 1963

Literature

George Isarlov, Catalogue des œuvres de Georges Braque, Paris, 1932, no. 349
John Russell, Braque, London, 1959, illustrated pl. 34
Galerie Maeght (ed.), Catalogue de l'œuvre de Georges Braque, Peintures 1924-1927, Paris, 1968, n.n., illustrated p. 14
Massimo Carrà, Tout l'œuvre peint de Braque, 1908-1929, Paris, 1973, no. 217, illustrated p. 96

Catalogue Note

Fruits, cruche et pipe is a fine example of Braque's renewed interest in traditional themes and methods of representation in the mid-1920s. His related paintings are figurative and restrained, and so extraordinary was the change in his style that modern scholars have linked it not only to the art of Cézanne, but also that of Chardin and Le Nain. During this period Braque painted several still life compositions against brown and black backgrounds, many featuring bisected objects such as the pitcher in the present work. Though more representational in nature, these images still reveal the preoccupation with painterly structure that characterised his earlier Cubist œuvre. As he later said, 'Objects don't exist for me except in so far as a rapport exists between them or between them and myself. When one attains this harmony one reaches a sort of intellectual non-existence—what I can only describe as a state of peace—which make everything possible and right. Life then becomes a perpetual revelation. That is true poetry' (quoted in John Richardson, Georges Braque, London, 1959, p. 27).

Impressionist & Modern Art Day Sale

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