106
106
Seder Purim (The Order of Purim), Scribe: Nathaniel Padovani, Padua: 1880
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
106
Seder Purim (The Order of Purim), Scribe: Nathaniel Padovani, Padua: 1880
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Judaica

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New York

Seder Purim (The Order of Purim), Scribe: Nathaniel Padovani, Padua: 1880
8 folios (8 x 10 3/8 in.; 203 x 265 mm) on paper; modern foliation in pencil in upper-outer corner of recto; written in elegant Italian square script in black ink. Decorated frames and borders throughout, with four pages featuring full-length illustrations of facing figures, some of them characters from the Purim story, flanking the text; full-page miniature on f. 4v; various other drawings of foliage and other decorative elements. Slight scattered staining; minor dampstaining in upper edge throughout; folios strengthened at gutter; minor marginal losses and a few repaired tears; ink biting; slightly misbound (the current f. 4 belongs after the current f. 6). Modern brown gilt- and blind-stamped morocco; modern paper flyleaves and pastedowns.
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Catalogue Note

This illustrated volume contains the blessings recited before and after reading the Book of Esther on Purim, as well as selections from the liturgical hymn Mi ka-mokha ve-ein ka-mokha, essentially a poetic paraphrase of the Purim story, which is traditionally recited in some communities on Shabbat zakhor, the Sabbath before the holiday. The piyyut was composed by the preeminent Jewish physician, poet, and philosopher Rabbi Judah Halevi (ca. 1075-1141) – the acrostic includes both the letters of the alphabet and his name twice – and each stanza incorporates at least one biblical verse. The legend associated with this poem contends that Halevi was unable to complete the work and left it unfinished for a time. When an itinerant pauper slipped into the poet’s study and provided the missing strophes, Halevi demanded that the man identify himself. The mysterious collaborator turned out to be Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra (1089-1167), a distinguished scholar in his own right. The traditional story maintains that, as a reward, Halevi gave Ibn Ezra his daughter’s hand in marriage.

The manuscript concludes with a summary of the laws and liturgy pertaining to the rituals of the search for, and destruction of, leavened foods that takes place on the day before Passover. Each page of text is decorated or illustrated by the artistic hand of the skilled scribe.

Important Judaica

|
New York