195
195

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOSEF BURGER

A TWELVE-PANEL 'EIGHTEEN SCHOLARS' COROMANDEL SCREEN
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
195

PROPERTY FROM THE COLLECTION OF JOSEF BURGER

A TWELVE-PANEL 'EIGHTEEN SCHOLARS' COROMANDEL SCREEN
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 62,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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New York

A TWELVE-PANEL 'EIGHTEEN SCHOLARS' COROMANDEL SCREEN
QING DYNASTY, 18TH CENTURY
the panels well-carved with a continuous scene depicting the convening of the famous 'Eighteen Scholars of the Tang', many engaging in literati pursuits such as calligraphy, painting, music, others conversing, enjoying cups of wine, and still others arriving carrying bundles of books, some on foot, some on horseback, at the palace gates, all amidst a verdant garden setting of rich foliage and elegant furnished pavilions, and bustling attendants, the 'Hundred Antiques' along the top border and real and mythical beasts below, the outer panels each with a single writhing four-clawed dragon and further beasts, the reverse undecorated
Height 101 1/4  in., 257.2 cm; Width of each panel 20 in., 50.8 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Baron Jean-Germain Cassel Van Doorn (1882-1953), New Jersey (by repute).
Acquired by the family of the present owner circa 1960, and thence by descent.

Catalogue Note

Emperor Taizong (r. 626-649) of the Tang dynasty, while still Prince Qin, was granted the authority to recruit his own elite council of advisors. He established the Institute of Literary Studies, comprised of some of the most accomplished and erudite Confucian scholars. Its members lived within the imperial household and were supplied with fine cuisine and wine. The scholars were divided into three shifts, with six members on duty at all times to accommodate Prince Qin’s irregular schedule. In honor of this august assemblage, after ascending the throne, Emperor Taizong commissioned the imperial artist Yan Liben (circa 601-674) to depict the eighteen scholars. The present composition is most likely derived from the recorded description of a Song Dynasty rendering of the famous group of scholars, which portrayed them gathering in small groups in an outdoor setting. This format evolved in the Ming dynasty to incorporate and formalize the ‘Four Accomplishments’; mastery of calligraphy, painting, weiqi and the qin.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York