567
567
A SILVER GILT TRIPOD CENSER
QING DYNASTY, DAOGAUNG / XIANFENG PERIOD
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
567
A SILVER GILT TRIPOD CENSER
QING DYNASTY, DAOGAUNG / XIANFENG PERIOD
Estimate
8,00012,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

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New York

A SILVER GILT TRIPOD CENSER
QING DYNASTY, DAOGAUNG / XIANFENG PERIOD
of compressed globular form rising to a waisted neck and everted rim surmounted by upright loop handles supported on three cylindrical legs, the exterior with three high-relief taotie masks separated by vertical flanges above a ground of leiwen with slightly raised centers all between narrow upper and lower bands, the masks, flanges, and bands gilt, the walls and legs cast hollow, with a six-character seal mark incised to the base Dingfu Xingyouhengtang zhenshang (installed in the [Prince's] official residence, the Hall of Constancy, to be treasured and enjoyed)
Height 6 3/4  in., 17.1 cm
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Provenance

Collection of Philip Edward Howard (1929-2016).

Catalogue Note

The Xingyouhengtang ('Hall of Constancy') seal mark identifies the censer as having belonged to the Fifth Prince Ding, Zaiquan of the Qing dynasty. Xingyouhengtang was the prince's main residence in the Forbidden City. Zaiquan was the great-great-grandson of the Qianlong Emperor and had a distinguished career in the service of the court until his death in 1854. The prince was a keen art collector and appears to have made it a habit to have his hall mark inscribed on his artifacts. His collector's seal with the same six-character inscription appears on a Yuan dynasty painting by Qian Xuan titled Laiqin zhizi tu (Crabapple and Gardenia), now in the collection of the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution. For his biography see Arthur W. Hummel, Eminent Chinese of the Ching Period, Taipei, 1991, pp. 728–729.

Important Chinese Art

|
New York