3728
3728
A RARE IMPERIAL GREEN OCTAGONAL GLASS BOTTLE VASE
WHEEL CUT MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT
3728
A RARE IMPERIAL GREEN OCTAGONAL GLASS BOTTLE VASE
WHEEL CUT MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
Estimate
400,000600,000
LOT SOLD. 500,000 HKD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong

A RARE IMPERIAL GREEN OCTAGONAL GLASS BOTTLE VASE
WHEEL CUT MARK AND PERIOD OF QIANLONG
of octagonal pear-shaped form, the compressed spherical body supported on a straight foot, elegantly curving to the tall, slightly tapered neck, the glass of an even translucent emerald-green tone, the recessed base with a four-character wheel cut reign mark within a square
14.7 cm, 5 3/4  in.
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Provenance

Bonhams Hong Kong, 28th May 2010, lot 205.

Catalogue Note

Striking for its brilliant emerald green colour, vases of this attractive faceted shape and with Qianlong marks within a square were probably made in the first twenty years of the Qianlong reign, when production of glass wares at the imperial court reached a peak in both quality and quantity. According to archival records, two glass workshops coexisted in the eighteenth century; the first, known as the bolichang (glass factory), located at Canchikou in Beijing, had been established in the 35th year of the Kangxi Emperor’s reign (equivalent to 1696), while the second was established during the Yongzheng reign and located within Yuanmingyuan. Both production centres enjoyed strong imperial patronage which greatly increased the status of this material, although the latter is believed to have created the finest vessels (see Peter Y.K. Lam, ‘The Glasshouse of the Qing Imperial Household Department’, Elegance and Radiance. Grandeur in Qing Glass. The Andrew K.F. Lee Collection, Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2000, p. 49).

Translucent green vases of this type are rare; one was sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 3rd November 1998, lot 1073; a slightly taller example was included in the exhibition Early Chinese Glass, Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2001, cat. no. 223; a third was included in the exhibition Elegance and Radiance. Grandeur in Qing Glass. The Andrew K.F. Lee Collection, Art Museum, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, cat. no. 21, together with four further vases of various colours, cat. nos 17-21; and a pair of unpublished vases is in the Musée Guimet, Paris.

Vases of this form and size but of difference colours include a turquoise example, in the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in Zhang Rong, Luster of Autumn Water. Glass of the Qing Imperial Workshop, Beijing, 2004, pl. 22; a yellow version, from the collection of Rudolph Scaeffer, in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, included in the exhibition Clear As Crystal, Red as Flame, China House Gallery, New York, 1990, cat. no. 39; and a realgar glass vase, from the collection of Walter and Phyllis Shorenstein, exhibited in A Chorus of Colours. Chinese Glass from Three American Collections, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, San Francisco, 1995, cat. no. 52, and sold at Christie’s Hong Kong, 1st December 2010, lot 2952.

The elegant form of this vase first appeared in the Yongzheng reign; a blue vase of this form with Yongzheng mark and of the period is illustrated in Zhang Rong, op. cit., pl. 6; and another was included in Elegance and Radiance, op. cit., cat. no. 16, together with a yellow example, cat. no. 15.

Important Chinese Art

|
Hong Kong