Lot 3618
  • 3618

AN IMPERIAL INSCRIBED ZITAN AND BOXWOOD SWORD QING DYNASTY, QIANLONG PERIOD

Estimate
500,000 - 700,000 HKD
bidding is closed

Description

  • zitan
  • 65.5 cm, 25 3/4  in.
with a honey-brown boxwood blade of elongated tapering form, carved on both sides with a poem followed by two seal marks reading qin shu xiaosa and shanshui qingyin, fixed to a zitan hilt with a wide cross-guard and a flaring grip and pommel, the grip carved in low relief with a pair of confronting archaistic kui dragons, between bands of 'horse-hoof' motifs encircling the cross-guard and pommel, the zitan scabbard similarly carved with pairs of confronting archaistic kui dragons, below shou characters flanking a central band of 'horse-hoof' motifs

Provenance

Collection of Gerard Levy (1934-2016), Paris.

Catalogue Note

Wooden swords (mujian), also known as patterned swords (banjian) or kin-swords (xiangjian), originated in the Jin dynasty. They served as accompanying accoutrements to official court attire, and were later used as ritual accessories carried by warriors. Such swords were often bestowed by the Emperor to officials in recognition for their military achievements and contributions.
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