246
246
Persia
KASHAN CALLIGRAPHIC LUSTRE POTTERY TILE
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT
246
Persia
KASHAN CALLIGRAPHIC LUSTRE POTTERY TILE
Estimate
8,00012,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Howard Hodgkin, Portrait of the Artist

|
London

Persia
KASHAN CALLIGRAPHIC LUSTRE POTTERY TILE
moulded in relief, decorated with an opacified tin glaze and lustre, raised cobalt blue inscription, mounted
glazed fritware
30.5 by 33cm., 12 by 13in.
13th century
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Catalogue Note

inscriptions

In Persian: ‘…sometime your rage is less…’

The techniques of alkaline glazing and lustre painting are said to have been introduced into Persia following the decline of the Fatimid dynasty in Egypt in the twelfth century, heralding a new phase of ceramic production. Lustre was thus first used in Persia under the Seljuk Sultanate (1040–1157), and although there was a brief interruption during the Mongol conquests between 1224-1250, by the next century, and into the next dynasty, the Ilkhanids (1256–1335) (a branch of the Mongol dynasty, literally ‘Little Khan’ a subordinate of the Khans ruling in China), lustre glazed tiles became de rigeur in Persian architecture. Kashan was a renowned centre for lustre ceramic production, and tiles such as the present example and the next would have adorned the walls of mosques, mausoleums, madrasas and palaces. This type of calligraphic tile would have formed part of a larger epigraphic frieze.

Howard Hodgkin, Portrait of the Artist

|
London