211
211
India, Gujarat or Sind
MUGHAL IVORY-INLAID WOOD CABINET
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211
India, Gujarat or Sind
MUGHAL IVORY-INLAID WOOD CABINET
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Howard Hodgkin, Portrait of the Artist

|
London

India, Gujarat or Sind
MUGHAL IVORY-INLAID WOOD CABINET
hinged drop-front opening to reveal nine drawers disguised as eleven, red stained ivory handles, reverse with simpler design featuring two bouquets in arabesque frame, on four short feet, with two keys
wood inlaid with ivory
39.2 by 54 by 38.2cm., 15 7/16 by 21 1/4 by 15in.
circa 17th century
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Catalogue Note

Ivory-inlaid cabinets such as the present example were produced in two main centres, notably Gujarat and Sind, and emulated the Mughal courtly style. A particular favourite motif was the flower, much loved by the Emperor Akbar (r. 1556 - 1605), which developed into a recognised stylistic motif under the Emperors Jahangir (r. 1605 –1627) and Shah Jahan (r. 1628 - 1658) (A. Jaffer, Luxury Goods from India: The Art of the Indian Cabinet-Maker, Victoria and Albert Museum, 2002, no. 24, pp.62-3). Robert Skelton attributes the formal treatment of flowers to Jahangir’s stay in Kashmir in the spring of 1620 during which time he commissioned his court artist, Mansur, to record the floral and fauna around them. It has further been suggested that local Mughal artists may have also been inspired by European albums of flowers (ibid.).

Howard Hodgkin, Portrait of the Artist

|
London