48
48
Jules Dalou
TONNELIER ; PAVEUR TÊTE NUE ; CASSEUR DE PIERRES ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DE LA MAIN GAUCHE ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DU CÔTÉ DROIT ; PAVEUR À LA DEMOISELLE, AU TRAVAIL COURBÉ 
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
48
Jules Dalou
TONNELIER ; PAVEUR TÊTE NUE ; CASSEUR DE PIERRES ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DE LA MAIN GAUCHE ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DU CÔTÉ DROIT ; PAVEUR À LA DEMOISELLE, AU TRAVAIL COURBÉ 
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Ginette et Alain Lesieutre, Collection Privée

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Paris

Jules Dalou
TONNELIER ; PAVEUR TÊTE NUE ; CASSEUR DE PIERRES ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DE LA MAIN GAUCHE ; HOMME APPUYÉ SUR UNE PELLE DU CÔTÉ DROIT ; PAVEUR À LA DEMOISELLE, AU TRAVAIL COURBÉ 
four bronzes, dark brown patina ; one bronzed plaster ; one biscuit porcelain
Signed DALOU, with foundry mark CIRE PERDUE A.-A. HEBRARD, L'homme appuyé sur une pelle numbered 11 and the Paveur tête nue numbered 5
Haut. de 8 à 17 cm; various sizes ranging from 3 1/8  in. to 6 5/8 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Amélie Simier, Jules Dalou, le sculpteur de la République, exh. cat. Petit-Palais, Paris, 2013, nos 176, 178, 179, 183, 197, 211.

Catalogue Note

The models of these figurines were discovered in the sculptor's studio at his death, among many other sketches of workers, in preparation for a Monument to the Laborers which was never built.

Project for a Monument to the Laborer (1889-1902)
The worker is an essential subject in Dalou's work, who notes his desire "to undertake, without further delay, the monument that he dreams of since 1889 to the glorification of the workers. This subject is in the air; it is current and will at some point be treated by another, it is necessary to mark the day. The future is here, it is the cult meant to replace the ancient mythologies. (Maurice Dreyfous, Dalou, his life his work, Paris, 1903, pp. 248-249). In the privy of his studio, the sculptor collects sketchbooks, plans and records in the form of bozzetti modeled on the spot. Although - as Dalou understood - his most ambitious and personal project was in line with his time, it would never find the funding. The death of his wife and his declining health put a permanent brake on the project: Indeed, Dalou had to rush to complete his major commissions received in order to guarantee the financial future of his disabled daughter.

Ginette et Alain Lesieutre, Collection Privée

|
Paris