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Joseph Windmills, London
A RARE SILVER AND TORTOISESHELL PAIR CASED SUN AND MOON VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1695
JUMP TO LOT
9
Joseph Windmills, London
A RARE SILVER AND TORTOISESHELL PAIR CASED SUN AND MOON VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1695
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

Joseph Windmills, London
A RARE SILVER AND TORTOISESHELL PAIR CASED SUN AND MOON VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1695
Movement: gilded full plate, verge escapement, large decoratively pierced balance cock engraved with foliage and short streamers at the neck, fusee and chain, tulip pillars, signed J. Windmills, London
Dial: silver champlevé, large aperture with rotating blued steel disc divided into day and night, the hours indicated on an outer semi-circular chapter ring with Roman numerals heightened with black wax, the daytime hours indicated by a golden sun with pointer, the night hours indicated by a silver moon with pointer surrounded by stars, outer Arabic minute ring with single blued steel hand, the lower half of the dial with central cartouches signed Windmills, London and surrounded by scrolling foliate flanked by two birds, dial edged with gilt ring
Cases: plain silver inner, the back with shuttered winding aperture, bezel split for glass retention, ring pendant and bow, numbered 183 and with case maker's mark I.I with coronet above in cameo for Jonathan Jones • tortoiseshell outer case decorated with symmetrically arranged piqué decoration in the form of stylised foliage, the bezel with three concentric rows of pique, the central row interspersed with fleur-de-lys, inner bezel punch numbered 183
diameter of outer case 52mm, inner case 46mm
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Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 126, pl. 61
Philip Priestley, Early Watch Case Makers of England 1631-1720, 2000, p. 23, fig. 18 
J. A. Neale, Joseph and Thomas Windmills, 1999, p. 91, fig. 3.27

Catalogue Note

Makers at the end of the 17th and beginning of the 18th century were by no means wedded to the standard dial configuration of concentric hour and minute hands, which had become more universal. As a result, some unusual dial designs were devised, particularly by English watchmakers. During this period there were four principal variations of dial design: the six-hour dial, the wandering hour dial, the differential dial and, as in this instance, the sun-and-moon dial. On the present watch, the sun and moon point to the hours as they move across the large semi-circular aperture, whilst minutes are indicated by the single hand on the outer ring.

Joseph Windmills, a highly regarded maker, was made Free of the Clockmakers' Company in 1671 and became its Master in 1702. Shortly after this date he formed a partnership with his son Thomas and the clocks and watches made by the firm were either signed Windmills, without forename, or J & T Windmills. At some time after this, father and son appear to have run more separate businesses and signed their products once again with an individual forename. Four other ‘Sun and Moon’ watches signed by Joseph Windmills are known, one example of which is illustrated in Cedric Jagger’s book, The World’s Great Clocks and Watches, 1977, p. 128.

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London