72
72
J.W. Benson, London
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN 1890, NO. 52110
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
72
J.W. Benson, London
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN 1890, NO. 52110
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 6,250 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

J.W. Benson, London
A FINE GOLD HUNTING CASED KEYLESS POCKET CHRONOMETER WITH UP-AND-DOWN 1890, NO. 52110
Movement: gilded frosted half-plate movement, spring detent escapement, bi-metallic compensation balance, blued steel helical spring, fusee and chain, signed J. W. Benson, 25 Old Bond Street, London, Special Warrants to H.M. the Queen and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, no. 52110
Dial: Willis white enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, two sunken subsidiary dials for seconds and state of wind, blued steel hands, signed J. W. Benson, London
Case: plain polished case with stepped bezels, the cover with monogram HB, pusher to inner bezel below 4 o'clock for hand setting and disengagement of winding mechanism when cover closed, plain polished gold cuvette, covers, cuvette, pendant and bow hallmarked for 18ct gold, date letter for London 1890, covers and cuvette with maker's mark E.W. in rectangular cameo for Edgar Wilkins
diameter 52mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 422, pl. 272

Catalogue Note

James W. Benson were successful retailers who acquired the business of Hunt & Roskell in 1889. They purchased some of their best watches from the manufacturer Victor Kullberg, of which the present watch is an excellent example. Kullberg signed the watches for Benson in the usual way, often adding a zero to their own numbering sequence. The spring detent escapement has a 'standing' detent which is positioned north-south, being the most favourable position when the watch is worn.

Kullberg's workbooks are owned by the Clockmakers' Company and record some of the manufacturing processes and suppliers. The white enamel dial of this watch was supplied by Willis and the hands by Hood, both regarded as the finest makers in their respective disciplines. The 'examiner' of the watch was Peter Wennerstom, Kullberg's nephew and, after Victor's death in 1890, his successor to the business. An important role, the examiner/springer was responsible for the final stages of the watch, including testing the depths and end shakes, fitting the mainspring, setting up the stop work and poising the balance.

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London