51
51
Ellicott & Company, London
A FINE GOLD PAIR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1803, NO. 9001
Estimate
15,00020,000
JUMP TO LOT
51
Ellicott & Company, London
A FINE GOLD PAIR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1803, NO. 9001
Estimate
15,00020,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

Ellicott & Company, London
A FINE GOLD PAIR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1803, NO. 9001
Movement: gilded full plate, Earnshaw-type spring detent escapement, decoratively engraved balance cock, a mask at the neck, Pennington-type 'double T' balance with two brass arms and two bi-metallic rims each carrying curved brass piece and with limiting screws at each end, blued steel helical spring, Pennington-type gold escape wheel, diamond endstone, fusee and chain, cylindrical pillars, signed Ellicott & Comp. Royal Exchange, London, No. 9001
Dial: white enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, large subsidiary seconds with Arabic numerals, gold hands, the hour with heart-shaped head, signed Ellicott & Compy., Royal Exchange
Cases: plain gold inner case, back with winding aperture • plain outer case, pendant with d-shaped bow, both cases hallmarked London 1803 and with maker's mark IM incuse for James Marson or Macklin
diameter of outer case 56.5mm, inner case 51mm
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Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 337, pl. 213
David Thompson, The Watches of Ellicotts of London Part II, Antiquarian Horology, No. 5, Vol. 23, Autumn 1997, p. 431
Antiquarian Horology, No. 5, Vol. 18, Spring 1990, p. 472 (illustrated)

Catalogue Note

Shortly before 1803, Edward Ellicott the younger sought to bring in fresh blood to his business and the name style changed to Ellicott & Company. By about 1806, James Taylor had been adopted as a partner and from this time until c.1818, the firm’s watches were inscribed Ellicott & Taylor, London (see: David Thompson, The Watches of Ellicots of London, Part I, Antiquarian Horology, Summer 1997). The movement in this watch is of particularly high quality and is unusually slim for a chronometer of the period. The double ‘T’ compensating balance is of a type generally accredited to Robert Pennington. This, and the fact that the Earnshaw-type detent escapement has Pennington’s unusual gold escape wheel and depth adjustment, strongly suggests he was Ellicott’s supplier. Further information on the Pennington balances can be found in Vaudrey Mercer's article: The Penningtons and their Balances, Antiquarian Horology, Vol. 12, No. 5, March 1981, pp. 514-522

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London