49
49
John Roger Arnold, London
A FINE AND LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1802, NO. 1869
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 17,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
49
John Roger Arnold, London
A FINE AND LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1802, NO. 1869
Estimate
10,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 17,500 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

John Roger Arnold, London
A FINE AND LARGE SILVER CONSULAR CASED POCKET CHRONOMETER 1802, NO. 1869
Movement: gilded full plate, Earnshaw-type spring detent escapement, balance cock decoratively engraved with a griffin and foliate scrolls, 'Z' balance, gold helical spring, diamond endstone, signed Jn. R. Arnold, London, Invt. et Fecit No. 1869
Dial: white enamel, Roman numerals, outer minute ring, large subsidiary seconds, blued steel hands, signed and numbered Arnold 1869
Case: plain silver consular case, the back opening to reveal fixed cover with winding aperture, inner and outer backs both hallmarked London, 1802 and with maker's mark TH in rectangular cameo for Thomas Hardy, inner cover numbered 1869
Deck box: later three-tier mahogany box with key
diameter 61mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Cecil Clutton, England
Sotheby's New York, 21 February 1996, lot 616
Christie's London, 2nd July 2004, lot 30

Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 330-331, pl. 208
Vaudrey Mercer, John Arnold & Son, 1972, pp. 157, 213
Hans Staeger, 100 Years of Precision Timekeepers from John Arnold to Arnold & Frodsham, 1763-1862, 1997, pp. 211-212
Cecil Clutton, Collectors' Collection, 1974, pp. 30-32, pls. 11a-b
Cecil Clutton & George Daniels, Watches, 1965, pls. 380-381
Cecil Clutton, Visits to Collections, Antiquarian Horology, No. 5, Vol. 2, December 1957, p. 86-87, fig. 1

Catalogue Note

In his book John Arnold & Son, Vaudrey Mercer lists the present chronometer and notes the fact that this watch has an Earnshaw escapement is "certainly a surprise, since at this time Earnshaw was demanding a reward for his escapement" [See op. cit. p. 157]. Nevertheless, it would have been prudent for John Roger to use Earnshaw’s version from time to time, if only to reaffirm his claim that the basic concept was his father’s invention.

Cecil Clutton included this watch in his book "Collector's Collection" where he notes that he gave the chronometer to George Daniels who "took it to task after which it ran for 2 1/2 weeks +2 and -2 seconds a day." Clutton also notes that, in his opinion, this chronometer is "of the highest quality, fully equal of anything executed in the life-time of John." This watch is one of three or four watches recorded where Arnold has fitted an Earnshaw type of spring detent escapement to one of his movements. It is otherwise typical, with a ‘Z’ balance, gold helical spring, standard signature and a griffin displayed on the cock. The four-arm escape wheel follows Earnshaw’s early tooth profile but made in the Arnold manner where much more of the wheel has been cut away for lightness. The detent is typically Arnold (only the reverse of normal) and has a side fitting jewel. The detent mounting is similar to Earnshaw’s, consisting of a brass arm and block for depth adjustment, but half of the block pivots on a rivet, with two pairs of opposing screws for the left/right adjustment.  

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London