28
28
John Wood, Grantham
AN INTERESTING AND VERY RARE MAHOGANY CASED PULL-WOUND GILT METAL AUXILIARY ALARM CIRCA 1775
Estimate
1,0001,500
JUMP TO LOT
28
John Wood, Grantham
AN INTERESTING AND VERY RARE MAHOGANY CASED PULL-WOUND GILT METAL AUXILIARY ALARM CIRCA 1775
Estimate
1,0001,500
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London

John Wood, Grantham
AN INTERESTING AND VERY RARE MAHOGANY CASED PULL-WOUND GILT METAL AUXILIARY ALARM CIRCA 1775
Movement: gilt metal pull-wound alarm, verge escapement, striking a bell to the top, cylindrical pillars
Dial: silvered, engraved with foliage, gilt metal height adjustable hook on which to hang a watch, female square mounted off-centre to connect with a watch’s winding square, dial to the bottom right for alarm setting and time indication with Roman numerals, half hour divisions between, central rotating disk for alarm setting with Arabic numerals and quarter hour divisions, single steel hand for hour indication, signed J Wood, Grantham
Case: rectangular mahogany case, hinged door to front revealing dial, to back revealing back plate and alarm barrel
height 13cm
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This auxiliary alarm is designed so that it can be adjusted to the current time shown by an attached watch and will ring when the watch arrives at a pre-selected time. A watch may be hung on the spring loaded adjustable hook, a female square through the dial below is made to engage with the watch's winding square and rotate with it as the watch unwinds. The subsidiary dial, bottom right, has a single hand for setting, against the Roman chapters, the time shown by the watch. The alarm is set by rotating the central Arabic figured ring against the hand’s short tail. The alarm is wound via a cord through the base of the rectangular mahogany case.

John Wood is recorded by Baillie as working in Grantham 1753-1797. A watch by Wood, number 332, having an inner case hallmarked for 1762, was in the Ilbert collection and is now in the British Museum. The dial has a name and place name instead of numerals. No record of another piece of this type has been found and nor of the granting of a patent. For a similar auxiliary for a watch but signed Skinner and designed to repeat hours and quarters, see: Sotheby’s New York, Masterpieces from the Time Museum, 19th June 2002, lot 167. 

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London