17
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George Graham, London
A VERY FINE AND RARE SILVER PAIR CASED CYLINDER WATCH WITH CENTRE SECONDS AND STOP SLIDE CIRCA 1737, NO. 5775
Estimate
10,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 13,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
17
George Graham, London
A VERY FINE AND RARE SILVER PAIR CASED CYLINDER WATCH WITH CENTRE SECONDS AND STOP SLIDE CIRCA 1737, NO. 5775
Estimate
10,00018,000
LOT SOLD. 13,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

George Graham, London
A VERY FINE AND RARE SILVER PAIR CASED CYLINDER WATCH WITH CENTRE SECONDS AND STOP SLIDE CIRCA 1737, NO. 5775
Movement: gilded full plate, cylinder escapement, decoratively pierced balance cock engraved with foliage and grotesque mask at the neck, flat balance, diamond endstone, fusee and chain, Egyptian pillars, signed and numbered Geo. Graham, London, 5775, gilt metal dust cap similarly signed and scratch numbered to the underside 5775
Dial: silver champlevé, Roman numerals, outer Arabic minute ring, blued steel beetle and poker hands, steel centre seconds hand
Cases: plain silver inner, stop slide beneath the bezel at 9 o'clock and with engraved S to the bezel above, the back with shuttered winding aperture, inner case numbered 5775 • plain silver outer case, both cases with maker's mark IW beneath a star incuse for John Ward 
width of outer case 52mm, diameter of inner 44.5mm
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Sotheby's London, 31st July 1981, lot 80

Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 189, pl. 102

Catalogue Note

A limited number of watches were produced with centre seconds during the first half of the 18th century and Graham appears to have made most of them. The hour and minute hands have been blued in the usual manner whilst the centre seconds hand has been left polished to provide contrast. A start/stop lever below the bezel of the inner case operates a ‘whip’ which is mounted between the plates and acts on the outer circumference of the cylinder.

George Graham (1674-1751) was one of England's most renowned clock and watchmakers. He served his apprenticeship with Henry Aske in 1688 and then entered the service of Thomas Tompion as a journeyman in 1695. Graham married one of Tompion's nieces and became his partner in 1704, succeeding to the business on Tompion's death in 1713. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society in 1721 and Master of the Clockmakers' Company in 1722. It is believed that he improved or perhaps invented the cylinder escapement. He used the verge escapement up to 1726 and then predominantly the cylinder thereafter. On his death in 1751, as a sign of the great respect in which he was held, Tompion's grave in Westminster Abbey was opened to receive the body of his former partner. 

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London