14
14
David Lestourgeon, London
A SILVER AND LEATHER COVERED EARLY DUMB HALF-QUARTER REPEATING SINGLE CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1715, NO. 1709
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT
14
David Lestourgeon, London
A SILVER AND LEATHER COVERED EARLY DUMB HALF-QUARTER REPEATING SINGLE CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1715, NO. 1709
Estimate
6,0008,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

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London

David Lestourgeon, London
A SILVER AND LEATHER COVERED EARLY DUMB HALF-QUARTER REPEATING SINGLE CASED VERGE WATCH CIRCA 1715, NO. 1709
Movement: gilded full plate, verge escapement, large decoratively pierced balance cock engraved with foliage and birds' heads and a female head with streamers at the neck, repeating on blocks mounted to the inside case back, signed David Lestourgeon, London No. 1709
Dial: silver champlevé dial, black Roman numerals with half hour divisions between and to the ring beneath, outer Arabic minute ring, all against a stippled ground, very unusual and fine blued steel foliate hour hand and fine poker minute hand, gilded outer ring
Cases: silver single case with leather covering, the bezels with trefoil piqué decoration, pulse piece between 6 and 7 o'clock, case back with hinged sliding shutter to the winding aperture, case maker's mark IW incuse probably for John Willoughby
diameter 55mm
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Literature

Terence Camerer Cuss, The English Watch 1585-1970, 2009, p. 164, pl. 88

Catalogue Note

This watch has rack and pinion repeating work with two hammers striking blocks mounted inside the case back. A rather more discrete form of repetition work than that sounded on a bell, the sound of the strike can be further silenced by pressing the pulse piece to the bezel which prevents the hammers from striking the blocks and instead pulses through the thumb or finger used. The quarter rack has an extension so that a single blow can be struck for the half-quarters, i.e. when seven and a half minutes or more have elapsed since the previous quarter.

David Lestourgeon was admitted as a Free Brother of the Clockmakers’ Company in 1698 and is believed to have been working as late as 1731. Interestingly, research carried out by Clive Ponsford into the wills of watch and clockmakers held at the National Archives, shows that Lestourgeon was both a Watchmaker and Innholder [see: Antiquarian Horology, Vol. 30, No.4, December 2007 p. 525].

The Celebration of the English Watch Part IV, George Daniels 20th Century Innovator

|
London