70
70
[Pope, Alexander]
AN ESSAY ON MAN...EPISTLE I. (II.) (III.) (IV). LONDON: "FOR J. WILFORD", [1733-34]
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 813 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
70
[Pope, Alexander]
AN ESSAY ON MAN...EPISTLE I. (II.) (III.) (IV). LONDON: "FOR J. WILFORD", [1733-34]
Estimate
8001,200
LOT SOLD. 813 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations, including The Garrett Herman Collection: The Age of Darwin

|
London

[Pope, Alexander]
AN ESSAY ON MAN...EPISTLE I. (II.) (III.) (IV). LONDON: "FOR J. WILFORD", [1733-34]
folio, large paper, 4 parts, complete, engraved head-pieces and initials, contemporary panelled calf, spine with raised bands, some slight staining at the beginning and end, upper joint partially split, corners worn, some staining and scuffing to covers
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Provenance

Nicholas Price, contemporary ownership signature on title-page of Part I

Catalogue Note

This copy is from the third "family group" of issues and editions identified by Griffith, each with "Epistle...Corrected by the author" on the title page; as follows:

An Essay on man. In Epistles to a Friend. Corrected by the author, (?23 April,) [1733], with epistle to the reader and contents of epistles I-III, printer's ornament on title, p.12 misnumbered 11, p.16 numbered correctly,  [Foxon P827; Griffith 307("Issue I"); Rothschild 1615]
An Essay on Man. In Epistles to a Friend. Epistle II. For J. Wilford, [1733], half-title, [Foxon P833; Griffith 300 ("Issue L"); Rothschild 1613-15]
An Essay on Man. In Epistles to a Friend. Epistle III. For J. Wilford, [1733], half-title, 2-line advertisement on p.20, [Foxon P840; Griffith 308 ("Issue Q"); Rothschild 1613-15]
An Essay on Man. In Epistles to a Friend. Epistle IV. For J. Wilford, [1734], with waternark T as usual, contents leaf, some slight damp-staining, [Foxon P845; Griffith 332 ("Issue Ub"); Rothschild 1613-15]

Large paper copy of Pope's essay on the limits of human knowledge, written in the author's later style and developed from a single epistle into a four-epistle poem. Issued anonymously by the author -- well aware of the hostile reception his Dunciad had received -- it was a consequence of the poet's readings in theology, cosmology, ethics and psychology. Although only a part of the planned great moral work on a monumental scale conceived by the author it became very popular and highly influential, available in many editions and in several European languages.

English Literature, History, Children’s Books and Illustrations, including The Garrett Herman Collection: The Age of Darwin

|
London