136
136
An impressive American silver six-piece table garniture, Howard & Co., New York, 1904
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 35,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
136
An impressive American silver six-piece table garniture, Howard & Co., New York, 1904
Estimate
25,00035,000
LOT SOLD. 35,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Collections & Curiosities: Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

|
New York

An impressive American silver six-piece table garniture, Howard & Co., New York, 1904
shaped circular and oval bases pierced and engraved with diaperwork below cast ribbon-tied laurel festoons, each applied with four seated musical cherubs, comprising a pair of seven-light candelabra and a pair of candlesticks, complete with detachable nozzles, die-stamped silver shades and spring-loaded white metal candle/shade holders, and a pair of fruit baskets
the undersides stamped: 'HOWARD & CO. NEW YORK / STERLING / 1904'
height of candelabra, 28 7/8 in.; candlesticks 13 3/4 in.; length of baskets 13 3/8 in.
73.5 cm; 35 cm; 34 cm
724 oz 5 dwt
22523 g
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Ross S. Sterling (1875-1949), Governor of Texas, 1931-33, founder of Humble Oil and Refining Co.; bequeathed to his daughter,
Mildred Sterling who in 1925 married the architect, Wyatt C. Hedrick (1888-1964), and thence to their daughter,
Jean Hedrick Darden (d. 2012)

Catalogue Note

The Ross Sterling Mansion, popularly known as the Texas White House, was completed in 1927 for Ross Sterling (1875-1949), founder of the Humble Oil and Refining Company (acquired by Standard Oil of New Jersey, 1959, merged in 1973 with Exxon, now ExxonMobil), who became Governor of Texas between 1931 and 1933. Built at Morgan’s Point overlooking Galveston Bay, near La Porte, its design was devised by the noted Texan architect Alfred Charles Finn (1833-1964) who based his plans, at the behest of Ross Sterling, on the White House, Washington, D.C. On a scale of two-fifths the size of the original, the 21,000 square foot mansion had 15 bathrooms, seven fireplaces and three kitchens, as well as a ballroom, billiards room, bowling alley and a dining room large enough to seat 300 people. The Sterling family eventually gave the Sterling Mansion to charity in 1946, and its present owner is Preserved in Time Inc., a local non-profit organization dedicated to education and historic preservation.

Howard & Co. was among New York City’s most opulent retail goldsmiths’ businesses during the last quarter of the 19th Century. Boasting a stock of the finest jewels, pearls, jewellery, silver and works of art and antiques, the firm was patronized by the elite of Manhattan, so much so that The New York Times in 1877 reported that, ‘It would be absurd to expect that the cheaper kinds [of gold and silver watches, jewellery and bric-a-brac] should be kept at a store which is frequently only by the wealthy.

The firm as established at 619 Broadway in 1866 by Joseph Platt Howard (1832-1909), who since 1856 had worked for Tiffany & Co., in partnership with his uncle, John Tasker Howard (1808-1888). Howard & Co. moved three times before, in 1878, finally securing the ground floor shop at 264 Fifth Avenue, the converted former mansion of Alexander T. Stewart (1803-1876), the wealthy dry goods merchant. J.P. Howard, who was later joined in business by his son Montague (b. 1866) and who is said to have been the dean of the jewellery trade in New York, continued to operate successfully until the financial downturn of 1907. He died suddenly aged 77 at his residence, Hotel Le Marquise, 12 East Thirty-first Street, New York, in December 1909, after which Howard & Co. continued its steep decline until closing early in 1914.

For information relating to J.P. Howard’s family and its English origins, see Abraham Howard of Marblehead, Mass., and his Descendants, privately printed, New York, 1897.

Collections & Curiosities: Silver, Ceramics, and Objects of Vertu

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New York