67
67
Attribué à Pietro di Francesco degli Orioli
CHEVELIER AGENOUILLÉ BÉNI PAR UN ROI
ATTRIBUTED TO PIETRO DI FRANCESCO DEGLI ORIOLI ; A KNEELING KNIGHT BLESSED BY A KING ; PEN AND BROWN INK, BROWN WASH HEIGHTENED WITH WHITE OVER BLACK CHALK, PRICKED FOR TRANSFER
Estimate
12,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 EUR
JUMP TO LOT
67
Attribué à Pietro di Francesco degli Orioli
CHEVELIER AGENOUILLÉ BÉNI PAR UN ROI
ATTRIBUTED TO PIETRO DI FRANCESCO DEGLI ORIOLI ; A KNEELING KNIGHT BLESSED BY A KING ; PEN AND BROWN INK, BROWN WASH HEIGHTENED WITH WHITE OVER BLACK CHALK, PRICKED FOR TRANSFER
Estimate
12,00015,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 EUR
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Bacri frères Antiquaires, Paris – Collection Jacques Bacri

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Paris

Attribué à Pietro di Francesco degli Orioli
SIENNE VERS 1458 - 1496
CHEVELIER AGENOUILLÉ BÉNI PAR UN ROI
ATTRIBUTED TO PIETRO DI FRANCESCO DEGLI ORIOLI ; A KNEELING KNIGHT BLESSED BY A KING ; PEN AND BROWN INK, BROWN WASH HEIGHTENED WITH WHITE OVER BLACK CHALK, PRICKED FOR TRANSFER
Plume, encre brune, lavis brun et pierre noire, rehauts de blanc, piqué pour transfert
Diam.: 210 mm ; 8 1/4 in
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

J. Richardson (L.2183);
Henry Oppenheimer,
Sa vente, Londres, Christie's, Old Master Drawings formed by the late Henry Oppenheimer, 10-14 July 1936, no 140 (comme Pinturicchio) 

Literature

H. S. Ede, Florentine  Drawings of the Quattrocento, Londres 1926, p. 27, no 59, reproduit, pl. 59 (comme Pinturicchio)

Catalogue Note

This small tondo pricked for transfer, is possibly a design for embroidery.  Highly refined in its execution and delicately drawn, it describes the scene, previously identified, as Pope Alexander VI, Lenzuoli Borgia (1492-1503) blessing a knight.  What is evident in this subtle drawing, which can be stylistically related to some painted works by the Sienese master Pietro di Francesco Orioli, is the ascending taste in Siena for Umbrian painting.  The present sheet clearly demonstrates a knowledge of Umbrian artists, especially the works of Pinturicchio and Perugino, whose style and influence can be seen here in this fine sheet.   The drawing was in fact attributed to Perugino when in the Richardson collection, while in the Oppenheimer sale, it was given to Pinturicchio. 

The rediscovery of the artistic personality of Pietro Orioli is credited to Alessandro Angelini, who was able to demonstrate in two successive articles in Prospettiva in 19821 that the body of paintings previously attributed to the retardataire personality of Giacomo Pacchiarotto (1470-1540), was instead the work of Pietro di Francesco Orioli.  The physiognomy and delicate description of the faces in the present sheet recall some of Orioli’s distinctive features, and his rounded modelling of the figures.  The Pope’s draped mantle falling heavily in folds, covering his knees and beyond, add a three-dimensional substance to this figure, and also provide a sense of animation, reinforcing the importance of his pivotal role in the composition.  The heavy geometric folds are also a focus for the use of light, which is a key element in the sculptural effect achieved with the subtle application of wash and white heightening.  This type of drapery clearly reveals the understanding of studies that were common in the Florentine botteghe in the second half of the fifteenth century. According to Alessandro Angelini, Orioli visited Florence in the early 1480’s.2 He was particularly influenced by the work of Domenico Ghirlandaio and Piero di Cosimo. Orioli seems to have enriched his repertoire looking both at Umbrian and Florentine Masters

No drawings have previously been attributed to Pietro Orioli who was born in 1458, and trained most probably in the workshop of Matteo di Giovanni.  Orioli seems to have been a highly devout man and apparently admired by his contemporaries both for the sanctity of his life, and his artistic talents. He often executed small religious worsk on panel for private devotion. 

The rounded shape of the present drawing and its size, could also strengthen the suggestion that this highly finished compositional study was executed to be embroidered on a religious garment.

1. A. Angelini, 'Da Giacomo Pacchiarotto a Pietro Orioli.', Prospettiva, no. 29 (1982), pp. 72-78; idem, ''Pietro Orioli e il momento urbinate'della pittura senese del Quattrocento.'', Prospettiva, no. 30 (1982), pp. 30-43

2. ibidem, pp. 31-32

Bacri frères Antiquaires, Paris – Collection Jacques Bacri

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Paris