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Details & Cataloguing

Boundless: Dubai

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Dubai

An Abbasid pottery bowl depicting a bird, Iraq, 9th/10th century
the earthenware body with a lightly everted rim, painted in lustre on an opaque white glaze, the centre depicting a bird, possibly a peacock, with five roundels to the reverse, both sides surrounded by contour panels on a dotted ground, base with inscription, broken and restored with some associated infill and overpainting
height: 7.5cm.; 3in. 
diam.: 23.4cm.; 9 3/16 in.  
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Catalogue Note

inscriptions

Under the base: possibly Baraka 'Blessing'

The bird represents one of the most common animate motifs used by the decorators of Abbasid pottery. On this dish, the bird has a large tail and is possibly a peacock or a pheasant, both of which were kept within royal households. The composition, in which the bird holds a leaf in its beak and which includes a peacock-eye or pearl-like border resembles a design topos often found on luxury Sassanian silk textiles that hold courtly connotations. A related dish is in the Louvre, see A. Caiger-Smith, Lustre Pottery, London, 1985, fig.8.

Boundless: Dubai

|
Dubai