44
44
A traveller's talismanic compendium, signed by Muhammad ibn Hasan, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1151 AH/1738-39 AD
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 40,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
44
A traveller's talismanic compendium, signed by Muhammad ibn Hasan, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1151 AH/1738-39 AD
Estimate
20,00030,000
LOT SOLD. 40,000 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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A traveller's talismanic compendium, signed by Muhammad ibn Hasan, Turkey, Ottoman, dated 1151 AH/1738-39 AD
Arabic manuscript on paper, comprising 57 folding panels, written in naskh script in black and red ink decorated with polychrome heightened with gold, housed in a circular papier-maché case, with textile pouch
14.3cm. diam.
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Catalogue Note

This manuscript is remarkable for its unusual form and varied contents. Three main folding components comprise concertina-form panels filled with text and illuminated with hilyes, circular diagrams, the Qasida al-Burda and diagrams of Jerusalem and Mecca and Medina. Alongside the scribe’s name and date of composition (Safr 1151 AH/May-June 1738 AD), the colophon mentions the place in which it was copied: Misis, in southern Turkey. Known during the Byzantine period as Mopsouestia, Misis was conquered by the Ottomans during the reign of Sultan Selim I (r.1512-22).

A list of the manuscript's contents are as follows:

The scales used on the Day of Judgement (Mizaan). The diagram shows the followers of the Imams of the four schools of law (Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal, Imam Shafi’i, Imam Malik, Imam Abu Hanifa) arranged around the scales.
A diagram showing the path of the righteous and the path of the disobedient, taken from the Tabaqat of al-Sha‘rani (d.1565). 
The circle circle of the bismillah, copied from the Shams al-Ma’arif of Ahmad ibn ‘Ali al-Buni.
The table of Surat al-Ikhlas, also taken from the Shams al-Ma’arif.
The circle of the 'Speech of God' (lafzat Allah), also taken from the Shams al-Ma’arif.
The circle of the Greatest Name, also taken from the Shams al-Ma’arif.
The table of Ayat al-Kursi, also taken from the Shams al-Ma’arif.
The Seven Verses (al-Ayat al-Saba’). 
A circle for release from all manner of problems. 
A circle for victory and success in all matters. 
A circle for binding the arms, tongues and ears of enemies. 
A circle for asking for generosity from the mighty. 
A circle for release from plague and pestilence. 
A circle for being free from the evil of enemies. 
A circle for being loved and desired by people. 
A circle for being victorious over enemies. 
A circle for asking for victory and glory.
A circle for being free of imprisonment and other catastrophes.

Arts of the Islamic World

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London