188
188
A turquoise-set and enamelled gold necklace, North India, 19th century
Estimate
7,00010,000
JUMP TO LOT
188
A turquoise-set and enamelled gold necklace, North India, 19th century
Estimate
7,00010,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Arts of the Islamic World

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London

A turquoise-set and enamelled gold necklace, North India, 19th century
comprising twenty-five pendants in the form of stylised blossoms with a central, larger pendant featuring facing birds, each set in the kundan technique with turquoise and mounted seed pearls, the reverse with red, green, blue and white enamel details, golden thread string with tassel terminals, fitted in custom box 
90cm. completely extended
33cm. area of beads
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Provenance

Ex-Cecil family collection, UK, since the late nineteenth century.

Catalogue Note

Sumptuous yet restrained in colour and design, this necklace exemplifies the elegance of nineteenth-century Indian jewellery. Passed down since the nineteenth century through the Cecil family, this necklace is referred to as the ‘Palmerston' necklace as according to family oral tradition it was gifted by the 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784-1865) to an ancestor in the nineteenth century. Mounted entirely with turquoise stones within gold settings, the underside of this necklace reveals rich green, red and white enamel tones and detailed floral motifs typical of Mughal ornamentation. The turquoise itself most probably came from a Persian mine, and it is extremely rare to see it used exclusively on Indian jewels, which usually favour colourful combinations of stones. This may be an indication of the influence of English taste in the Subcontinent and was possibly originally created as a private commission. 

Comparable work is found on a hair ornament attributed to Delhi, circa 1850, published in S. Stronge, N. Smith and J.C. Harle, A Golden Treasury: Jewellery from the Indian Subcontinent, Exh. cat., Cartwright Hall, Bradford Art Galleries and Museums, 24 Sept.-27 Nov. 1988; Zamana Gallery, London, 13 April-25 June 1989, p.57.

Arts of the Islamic World

|
London