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PROPERTY FROM AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Two Fragmentary Greek Antiquities,  5th/4th Century B.C.
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 4,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
3

PROPERTY FROM AN ENGLISH PRIVATE COLLECTION

Two Fragmentary Greek Antiquities,  5th/4th Century B.C.
Estimate
3,0005,000
LOT SOLD. 4,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Ancient Marbles: Classical Sculpture and Works of Art

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London

Two Fragmentary Greek Antiquities,  5th/4th Century B.C.
comprising an Attic red-figured lekythos, circa 480-460 B.C., decorated with a striding figure of Artemis holding a torch and bow, and wearing a long chiton and leopard skin, a quiver on her back, palmettes on the vessel's shoulder, a meander band below, the body of the vessel scratched with a fragmentary Greek inscription reading ΛΕΚΥΘΟΣ ΤΙΜΑ[ΝΑΚ]ΤΟΣ ΑΝΤΙΜΕΝ ("l am the lekythos of Timanax son of Antim(enes)"), and a terracotta head of a goddess moulded in relief, Magna Graecia, 4th Century B.C., her centrally-parted hair surmounted by a stephane, and wearing an acorn-shaped earring.
Lekythos 14.5 cm. high; head 16.5 cm. high
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Provenance

John Rowland Fothergill (1876 - 1957), Warwickshire
by inheritance to his half-brother Reginald Hannay Fothergill (1879 - 1971), Westmorland
by descent to the present owner

Catalogue Note

The name Timanax, restituted here in the genitive form, is well attested in Classical Athens by fifteen ostraka (F. Willemsen and S. Brenne, Athenische Mitteilungen, vol. 106, 1991, p. 155).

John Rowland Fothergill was a close friend of Oscar Wilde’s, both before and after Wilde’s prison sentence, and an associate of the artist William Rothenstein, with whom he opened the Carfax Gallery in 1898. The same year Wilde’s friend Robbie Ross, the art dealer and critic, introduced Fothergill to Edward Perry Warren, the American art collector who donated many of his antiquities to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Fothergill became Warren’s personal secretary for a time and a member of the Lewes House brotherhood (see Osbert Burdett and E.H. Goddard, Edward Perry Warren, The Biography of a Connoisseur, 1941, containing several mentions of Fothergill). Before WWI he lived in Italy, where he met Paul Hartwig and Wolfgang Helbig, two of the most prominent classical archaeologists of their time, both of them involved in collecting and trading classical. Antiquities. In later life Fothergill became an innkeeper, first in Thame, then in Ascot, and finally in Market Harborough. He was renowned as a chef and authored several books on cooking, as well as gardening.

Ancient Marbles: Classical Sculpture and Works of Art

|
London