2227
2227
Very Fine De Riemer Family Federal Giltwood and Églomisé-Paneled Looking Glass, New York, circa 1815
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2227
Very Fine De Riemer Family Federal Giltwood and Églomisé-Paneled Looking Glass, New York, circa 1815
Estimate
5,0007,000
LOT SOLD. 20,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

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New York

Very Fine De Riemer Family Federal Giltwood and Églomisé-Paneled Looking Glass, New York, circa 1815
backboard retains an old retailers label for Edward Baker of Poughkeepsie and two handwritten labels, one inscribed This Elsie De Riemer / mirror belongs - / to Mark VK Sauft - / Sara S. Van Kleeck / Elizabeth Sauft North / daughter of Mary V.K. Sauft / Granddaughter of Sarah Van Kleeck; the other inscribed This mirror was owned by / Elsie Babbington De Riemer, wife / of Peter De Riemer of New York / mother of Elsie (De Riemer) Sleight / who was the wife of /Jacobus Sleight. / Jacobus Sleight and Elsie / De Riemer Sleight were the / parents of Henry A. Sleight – (who married Mary A. Ward) / the parents of Harriet S. Scott / A--- M. Sleight – Sara S. Van Kleeck. // The family of De Riemer / lived in the Glebe House / from 1796 to 1815.
Height 52 in. by Width 22 1/2 in.
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Provenance

Petrus De Riemer(1739-1814) and Elsie Babbington (1744-1818), Albany and Dutchess, New York;
Elsie Sleight (1777-1841), Albany and Dutchess, New York, daughter;
Henry Sleight (1817-1879), La Grange, Dutchess, New York, son;
Sara S. Van Kleek, daughter;
Mary Swift, daughter;
Elizabeth Swift North, daughter;
Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, Prints, Folk Art and Decorative Arts, January 21, 2000, sale 9314, lot 154;
Alan Miller, Quakertown, Pennsylvania.

Catalogue Note

The elaborately carved eagle flanked by flowering urns surmounting an églomisé panel, are all elements that were often incorporated in New York State during the early nineteenth century.  At one time, looking glasses of this form were called "Albany Glasses," as it was thought they were made exclusively in Albany, New York.1 

An example with a similarly carved eagle and frame is held in the collection of the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the U.S. Department of State (illustrated in Treasures of State, edited by Alexandra Rollins, 1991, p. 238, no. 147).  Another similar example is in the Museum of the City of New York, illustrated in Barquist's American Tables and Looking Glasses, p. 325, fig. 74 and Sack's American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, p. 1533, P4582.

"The Glebe House," acquired by members of Christ Church in 1767, and later abandoned by loyalist Reverend John Beardsley when the Revolutionary War broke out, was purchased by Peter De Riemer in 1796.2 The house in Poughkeepsie, New York is still open and is held by the Junior League and the Dutchess County Historical Society.

1 Treasures of State: Fine and Decorative Arts in the Diplomatic Reception Rooms of the U.S. Department of State, curated by Clement Conger and edited by Alexandra Rollins, (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1991), p. 238.
2 Harold Donaldson Eberlein and Cortlandt Van Dyke Hubbard, Historic Houses of the Hudson Valley, (New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1990), pp. 74-75. 

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York