2152
2152
Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Side Chair, carving probably by John Pollard or Richard Butts, Philadelphia, circa 1770
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2152
Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Side Chair, carving probably by John Pollard or Richard Butts, Philadelphia, circa 1770
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 12,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

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New York

Very Fine and Rare Chippendale Carved Mahogany Side Chair, carving probably by John Pollard or Richard Butts, Philadelphia, circa 1770

Provenance

Joseph Kindig, Jr., York, Pennsylvania;
Private Collection;
Sotheby's, New York, Fine American Furniture, Folk Art, Folk Paintings and Silver, New York, June 28, 1990, sale 6051, lot 443.

Catalogue Note

Displaying the number V on the seat frame, this side chair is among the finest Philadelphia interpretations of Gothic chair designs published in The Gentleman & Cabinet-Maker’s Director by Thomas Chippendale.1 The exceptional carving found on the chair is attributed to John Pollard (1740-1787) or Richard Butts, two highly skilled Philadelphia carvers who worked in partnership together by 1773 on Chestnut Street, between Third and Fourth Streets, opposite Carpenter’s Hall. On February 22nd of that year, the Pennsylvania Gazette reported that Pollard and Butts could provide “all manner of carving” at the Sign of the Chinese Shield.” This side chair incorporates carving motifs – pendant bellflowers, beading, and acanthus flourishes -- that are characteristic of the Pollard/Butt shop oeuvre and incorporated into Pollard’s surviving work, including on a set of chairs made for David Deshler (d. 1792). 2

A similar set of Gothic side chairs with carving attributed to Pollard include one with no recorded history in the collection of the Chipstone Foundation.3 William M. Hornor illustrates another side chair from the set in Blue Book Philadelphia Furniture, 1935, pl. 354 as the property of Richard Wistar Harvey (1868-1939), the son of Alexander Elmslie Harvey and Rachel Lewis Wistar of Philadelphia who married in 1865. Rachel Wistar was the daughter of Richard Wistar (1790-1863) and Hannah Owen Lewis (1795-1857) and a descendant of the prominent Wistar, Morris and Wharton families of Philadelphia.  A set of six other related Gothic chairs with carving attributed to Pollard was owned by Cecil Franklin Backus of Philadelphia and sold in these rooms, Important Americana from a Private Collection, sale 8776, lot 124. Two other side chairs illustrated by Sack and Kindig with the same splat as the Backus chairs features knee carving a claw feet that are very similar to this chair.4

1 Thomas Chippendale, The Gentleman & Cabinet-Maker’s Director (London, 1762), pl. X and XVI.
2 See Israel Sack Inc., American Antiques from Israel Sack Collection, Volume VI, P3920, p. 48.
3 See Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque, American Furniture at Chipstone, Madison, 1984, no. 59, pp. 136-7.
4 See Sack, Volume V, P3925, p. 1169 and Joe Kindig, Jr., advertisement in The Magazine Antiques (February 1951).

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York