2119
2119
Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Side Chair, possibly from the Benjamin Randolph workshop, Philadelphia, circa 1770
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2119
Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Side Chair, possibly from the Benjamin Randolph workshop, Philadelphia, circa 1770
Estimate
15,00025,000
LOT SOLD. 27,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

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New York

Chippendale Carved and Figured Mahogany Side Chair, possibly from the Benjamin Randolph workshop, Philadelphia, circa 1770
chair marked V, retains a rich dark historic surface.
Height 38 3/4 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Christie's, New York, Important American Furniture, Silver, Prints, Folk Art and Decorative Arts, January 22, 1994, sale 7820, lot 321.

Catalogue Note

This side chair retains a rich dark historic surface and is numbered V of a larger set of chairs. It represents a popular chair pattern made in Philadelphia during the Colonial period, with a pierced splat adapted from Plate XIII and Plate XIV of The Gentleman & Cabinet-Maker’s Director by Thomas Chippendale (London, 1762). This chair is associated with the shop of Benjamin Randolph (1737-1792) on the basis of shared similarities with labeled side chairs numbered III and IV in the Karolik Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and two numbered I and II in a private collection.1 These chairs are the focus of the article by Philip D. Zimmerman, “Labeled Randolph Chairs Rediscovered,” in American Furniture 1998, edited by Luke Beckerdite (Milwaukee: The Chipstone Foundation), pp. 81-98.

A nearly identical side chair, number III of a set, is offered as lot 2120 in this sale. Another side chair possibly made as part of the same set is illustrated in The Philadelphia Chair, 1685-1785 by Joseph K. Kindig, III.2 Several other chairs are known with a closely related design representing multiple shop traditions. One at Yale University with a history in the Biddle family marked V and I with a slip seat frame numbered I displays addition acanthus carving at the top of the splat but is otherwise very similar.3 An armchair at Yale University, numbered II on the seat frame and slip seat, was formerly in the collection of Louis Guerineau Myers.4 An armchair at Winterthur Museum displays variations in the carving on the splat and knees.5 One from the Collection of Abram R. and Blanche M. Harpending was sold in these rooms, February 1, 1985, lot 609. Another with a scalloped seat rail is illustrated in Israel Sack, Inc., American Furniture from Israel Sack Collection (Washington, D.C., 1965), Vol. II, p. 313, no. 174.

1 Edwin Hipkiss, Eighteenth-Century American Arts: The M. and M. Karolik Collection (Boston, 1950). no. 89, pp. 152-3 .
2 Joseph K. Kindig III, The Philadelphia Chair (York, Pennsylvania, 1978), fig. 54.
3 See Patricia E. Kane, Three-Hundred Years of American Seating Furniture (Boston, 1976) no. 92, p. 109-110.
4 Ibid, no. 90, pp. 106-108.
5 See Joseph Downs, American Furniture (New York, 1952), no. 50.

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York