2054
2054
Fine and Rare Queen Anne Mahogany Daybed, Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1760
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 3,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2054
Fine and Rare Queen Anne Mahogany Daybed, Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1760
Estimate
2,5003,500
LOT SOLD. 3,750 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

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New York

Fine and Rare Queen Anne Mahogany Daybed, Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1760

Provenance

Sotheby's, New York, Fine Americana, October 26, 1991, sale 6227, lot 394;
Alan Miller, Quakertown, Pennsylvania.

Literature

George Parker, “Early American Furniture in Wisconsin,” Wisconsin Academy Review,  43: 2 (Spring 1997), 7.

Catalogue Note

With its yoked crest, elongated vase splat, scalloped seat rail, cabriole legs ending in pad feet, and turned stretchers, this day bed or couch follows a type of Queen Anne style chair made in Boston in the mid-eighteenth century. Its adjustable back allowed for it to be used for reclining at meals, resting during the day, and sleeping at night.  The form was produced during the first half of the eighteenth century, although not widely, for an elite clientele.

Several other similar daybeds with six cabriole legs, squared rear legs, block and spindle stretchers, yoke-shaped crest rails and vasiform splats are known. One of walnut is in the collection of the Chipstone Foundation.1 Another made of maple is in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.2 Another maple example is at Colonial Williamsburg.3 One at Winterthur Museum of maple has double stiles in the back.4 One at the Metropolitan Museum of Art also made of maple has straight rails and stiles with turned finials.5 Two other walnut examples are in the respective collections of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village.

1 See Oswaldo Rodriguez Roque, American Furniture at Chipstone, Milwaukee, 1984, no. 90, pp. 196-7.
2 See Richard Randall, American Furniture in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1965, no. 190, pp. 230-231.
3 See Barry Greenlaw, New England Furniture at Williamsburg, Williamsburg, 1974, no. 87, pp. 102-103.
4 Nancy Richards and Nancy Evans, New England Furniture at Winterthur, Winterthur, 1997, no. 101, pp. 190-191.
5 See Morrison Heckscher, American Furniture in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1985, no. 65, pp. 113-114.

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York