2044
2044
The Elliot Family Queen Anne Shell-Carved Cedrela Compass-Seat Side Chair, New York, circa 1740
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 10,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT
2044
The Elliot Family Queen Anne Shell-Carved Cedrela Compass-Seat Side Chair, New York, circa 1740
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 10,000 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York

The Elliot Family Queen Anne Shell-Carved Cedrela Compass-Seat Side Chair, New York, circa 1740
chair and original slip seat marked VI and bearing labels Ginio Morris, V. Brock and Virginia Morris Angel. Fragment of original blue wool slip seat show cover survived and current made to match.

Height 39 in.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

William Henry Elliot, New York;
Richard McCall Elliot, New York;
Marjorie Elliot Henderson, Philadelphia;
Virginia Brock Morris Moorehead;
thence by descent to the consignor to;
Sotheby's, New York, Fine Americana and Silver, June 17, 1999, sale 7329, lot 172;
Alan Miller, Quakertown, Pennsylvania.

Catalogue Note

Retaining an old finish, this chair and its original slip seat are numbered VI. Its design reflects the influence of Boston chairs imported into New York from about 1735.1 The low profile of the back, broad horseshoe seat, large squared claw and ball feet and tapered rear legs ending in rounded slipper feet are characteristics associated with chairs made in New York. These characteristics are found on a set of mahogany chairs with a pierced splat with the initials of Robert (1718-1775) and Margaret (Beekman) Livingston (1724-1800), who married in 1742.  Chairs from this set are represented in the collections of Yale University, the Museum of the City of New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, Bayou Bend, and Winterthur. 

A New York side chair at Winterthur has a similar overall design in the double-crook stiles, identical splat pattern, double-serpentine beaded shoe and pad feet.2 Similar shell-carved knees with alternating projecting and receding lobes, squared claw feet and rear shaped feet are found on an armchair at Winterthur Museum from a set made for the Van Cortlandt family of New York.3 The shell and highly stylized acanthus carving on the crest rail relates to carving found on a New York side chair owned by Bernard and S. Dean Levy.4

1 See Leigh Keno, Joan Barzilay Freund, and Alan Miller, “The Very Pink of the Mode: Boston Georgian Chairs, Their Export, and Their Influence,” American Furniture, edited by Luke Beckerdite, (Hanover and London, 1996): 266-306.
2 See Joseph Downs, American Furniture (New York, 1952), no. 105.
3 See Joseph Downs, American Furniture, no. 26.
4 See Luke Beckerdite, “Immigrant Carvers and the Development of the Rococo Style in New York, 1750-1770,” American Furniture (Hanover and London, 1996): fig. 50, p. 257.

The Highly Important Americana Collection of George S. Parker II from the Caxambas Foundation

|
New York