76
76

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

Milton Avery
WATER CARRIER 
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT
76

PROPERTY FROM AN IMPORTANT PRIVATE COLLECTION

Milton Avery
WATER CARRIER 
Estimate
500,000700,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

American Art

|
New York

Milton Avery
1885 - 1965
WATER CARRIER 
signed Milton Avery and dated 1947 (lower right)
oil on canvas
30 by 40 inches
(76.2 by 101.6 cm)
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Provenance

Grace Borgenicht Gallery, New York 
Rosemarie Sena, New York, 1980 (acquired from the above)
Grace Borgenicht Gallery, New York
Acquired by the present owner from the above, 1995

Exhibited

Houston, Texas, Sarah Campbell Blaffer Gallery, University of Houston; Mexico City, Mexico, Museo de Arte Moderno de Mexico; Monterrey, Mexico, Museo de Monterrey; Caracas, Venezuela, El Museo de Bellas Artes; Newport Beach, California, Newport Harbour Art Museum, Milton Avery in Mexico and After, August 1981-July 1982, illustrated p. 44

Catalogue Note

In the summer of 1946, Milton Avery and his family spent three months in Mexico exploring the country and immersing themselves in its rich culture. The trip had a significant impact on the artist, inspiring a series of paintings that focused on the role of women outside of the home and further explored his interest in juxtaposing bold colors. In Water Carrier, painted in 1947, Avery depicts a female figure skillfully balancing a clay water jug on her shoulder against the backdrop of a rural townscape. He flattens and simplifies the buildings and sky but maintains the figurative form of the woman in order to successfully convey the narrative of the scene. As seen in many of Avery's pictures from this period, he experiments with contrasting colors by placing geometric forms of pink, blue and brown within a less spatially defined background. The bright hues reflect Avery's desire to capture the mood of the distinctive landscape and vibrant culture of Mexico.  

In the catalogue for the 1981-82 exhibition Milton Avery in Mexico and After, Dore Ashton writes, "If we look back to the paintings of Mexico of the late 1940s, we find the characteristic Avery sensibility and yet, we find an indelible remembrance of a specific place. The way the people move slowly through dry, heated landscape, is peculiar to Mexico, or at least to Avery's vision of Mexico. The colors are certainly heated, but never shrill. Avery was painting in Mexico during the height of popularity of the Mexican muralists; yet, his calm, tender vision prevailed. Nothing swayed him from his original course" (Milton Avery in Mexico and After, New York, 1981, p. 18). 

American Art

|
New York