145
145

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED AMERICAN COLLECTION

Thomas Worthington Whittredge
SCENE ON THE UPPER DELAWARE, STATE OF NEW YORK
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 87,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT
145

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED AMERICAN COLLECTION

Thomas Worthington Whittredge
SCENE ON THE UPPER DELAWARE, STATE OF NEW YORK
Estimate
50,00070,000
LOT SOLD. 87,500 USD
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

American Art

|
New York

Thomas Worthington Whittredge
1820 - 1910
SCENE ON THE UPPER DELAWARE, STATE OF NEW YORK
signed W Whittredge (lower right)
Oil on canvas
17 by 23 inches
(43.2 by 58.4 cm)
Painted circa 1872-75.
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Kennedy Galleries, New York
Norman Hirschl, New York
Preston Morton Collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, California, 1960 (gift from the above)
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited

Washington, D.C., Adams Davidson Galleries, Quiet Places: The American Landscapes of Worthington Whittredge, 1982, no. 21, p. 58, illustrated

Literature

Katherine Harper Mead, The Preston Morton Collection of American Art, Santa Barbara, 1981, p. 101, illustrated
Anthony F. Janson, Worthington Whittredge, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1989, pp. 131, 133, 180, fig. 99, illustrated

Catalogue Note

With regards to the present work, Anthony F. Janson states that, "The essential qualities of his style are demonstrated by a group of landscapes along the Delaware River, which lies southwest of the Catskills, just beyond the Shawungunk River. The masterpiece among these paintings is Scene on the Upper Delaware, State of New York . . . In it, the intuitive apprehension of light receives its most radiant expression of all Whittredge's paintings. He uses a myriad of small, pointed brushstrokes to suggest forms through the sparkling play of colored light across the landscape, which achieves an extraordinary range of visual effect surpassing anything he had painted before. Light becomes the expression of an immediate, yet profoundly lyrical response to a visual impression. The serene naturalism evinces an unusual receptiveness to nature, which the artist allows to speak directly through his innately poetic sensibility." (see Anthony F. Janson, op. cit., p. 131)

American Art

|
New York