72
72
A. Codognato, Venice
TWELVE WALL PLATES
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
72
A. Codognato, Venice
TWELVE WALL PLATES
Estimate
2,0003,000
LOT SOLD. 11,875 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Alexander Iolas

|
London

A. Codognato, Venice
TWELVE WALL PLATES
shell and scroll border, centered with profiles of Roman emperors: Otho , Nero, Caesar, Nero, Augustus, Galba, Vespasianus, Vitellius, Claudius, fitted with suspension loop for wall
Quantity: 12
stamped 'lavorazione a mano per la Dirra, A. CODOGNATO', Italian standard and maker's mark
parcel-gilt silver
30.5cm., 12 in. diameter; 6940gr., 223oz 3dwt
Modern
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Catalogue Note

In 121 AD, G. Suetonius Tranquillus, secretary to Emperor Hadrian, wrote a biographical history of the first twelve emperors of Rome entitled De vita Caesarum, usually rendered in English as The Twelve Caesars. During the Renaissance, a first edition of Suetonius’s work was published in 1470 followed by further reprints and translations into all the main European languages. Many of these were illustrated by prints of the emperors taken from coins or statues or imagined by the artists from Suetonius’s often gossipy accounts. These interpretations were then copied by renaissance designers for various series of medals, busts or Limoges enamels, see for example the set of 24 drawings after Titian sold Sotheby's London, 24 February 2015, lot 184.

There are two Attilio Codognato, both from the same venetian goldsmith family which became famous around the beginning of the 20th century for their creations which were requested from all over Europe. The older Attilio was born in 1867 (and died in 1928) while his nephew Attilio was born in 1938. The A. Codognato shop is based in 1295, San Marco square in Venice since 1866.
The Older Attilio was inspired by what later became known as the “ Italian Archaeological Goldsmithing”, following the rediscovery of the Etruscan style through contemporary archaeological digs. He was also the prime goldsmith to the Saint Marc’ Basilica, a tradition followed also by his son and his nephew Attilio.

Alexander Iolas

|
London