71
71
Paul Manship
AMERICAN
BUST OF VIVIAN ST GEORGE
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
71
Paul Manship
AMERICAN
BUST OF VIVIAN ST GEORGE
Estimate
15,00020,000
LOT SOLD. 18,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

19th & 20th Century Sculpture, including works from Cecil Howard’s Studio

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London

Paul Manship
1885 - 1966
AMERICAN
BUST OF VIVIAN ST GEORGE
inscribed, signed, and dated: To Mrs ST George / From Paul Manship / Sculptor / 1924
terracotta, on a green marble base
bust: 30cm., 11 7/8 in. 
overall: 45.5cm., 17 7/8 in. 
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Provenance

Evelyn St George, London, England, 1924 (mother of the sitter);
Vivien St George, England;
by descent in the family to the present owners

Catalogue Note

In 1921, following a turn with the Red Cross in Italy, Paul Manship moved to London with his family as guests of John Singer Sargent.  Sargent introduced Manship to many members of London society, procuring the sculptor a number of important portrait commissions, including Lady Cholmondeley, whom he sculpted in marble in 1923.  Also in Sargent's coterie was the Irish painter, Sir William Orpen, who became one of Manship's closet companions during that first winter in London.  Orpen, like his friend Sargent, painted elegant portraits of society women.  In 1908, Orpen painted Mrs. Evelyn St. George, the daughter of the president of the National Bank of America and a prominent figure in London.  This marked the beginning of a storied artist-muse relationship, as well as a passionate love affair.  In 1912, Mrs. St. George gave birth to their daughter, Vivian. 

In the spring of 1922, Manship moved to Paris to live and work, where he stayed until 1926.  Manship was inspired by the energy of the city and some of his most well-known works were produced during these years, including Diana, Acteon, Europa and the Bull, Flight of Europa and Indian Hunter and His Dog.  Manship wrote, "Paris is the center of the world--and while I am not in the center of the whirlpool I feel the motion of it," (J. Manship, op. cit., p. 97).   In 1924, when Vivian St. George was twelve years old, Mrs. St. George commissioned Manship to create a portrait of their daughter.  Manship fashioned the young Vivian as Diana, a subject he had explored just three years earlier, with her hound at her side and arrows in her hand.  Manship appropriated Diana as subject, synthesizing classical sculptural traditions borrowed from archaic Greek sculpture with his distinctly stylized modern forms to create a compelling portrait of a young girl. The present terracotta is a rare bust version of Manship's portrait which comes directly from the sitter's family.

RELATED LITERATURE
P. Vitry, Paul Manship, Paris, 1927, pp. 45, 74; E. Murtha, Paul Manship, New York, 1957, no. 164, p. 163; J. Manship, Paul Manship, New York, 1989, p. 97

19th & 20th Century Sculpture, including works from Cecil Howard’s Studio

|
London