447
447

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Tiffany Studios
"WISTERIA" TABLE LAMP
Estimate
600,000800,000
JUMP TO LOT
447

PROPERTY FROM A DISTINGUISHED PRIVATE COLLECTION

Tiffany Studios
"WISTERIA" TABLE LAMP
Estimate
600,000800,000
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Tiffany: Dreaming in Glass

|
New York

Tiffany Studios
"WISTERIA" TABLE LAMP
shade impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK
mounting post on underside of shade crown impressed 10116
base plate impressed TIFFANY STUDIOS/NEW YORK/5795
leaded glass, patinated bronze
27 1/2  in. (69.8 cm) high
18 3/8  in. (48.7 cm) diameter of shade
circa 1905
Read Condition Report Read Condition Report

Provenance

Private Collection, Florida
Christie's New York, December 15, 2010, lot 218
Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature

William Feldstein, Jr. and Alastair Duncan,
The Lamps of Tiffany Studios, New York, 1983,
pp. 36-37
Alastair Duncan, Fin de Siècle Masterpieces from the Silverman Collection, New York, 1989, p. 40
Alastair Duncan, Louis C. Tiffany:  The Garden Museum Collection, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 2004, p. 293
Martin Eidelberg, Alice Cooney Frelinghuysen, Nancy A. McClelland and Lars Rachen, The Lamps of Louis Comfort Tiffany, New York, 2005, pp. 106-107
Martin Eidelberg, Nina Gray and Margaret K. Hofer, A New Light on Tiffany:  Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls, London, 2007, p. 48

Catalogue Note


The “Wisteria” table lamp model, designed by Clara Driscoll in 1901, is an icon both of Tiffany Studios and of American design from the Twentieth Century.  With its lush, dripping vines masterfully articulated in nearly 2,000 pieces of individually selected and cut favrile glass, the Wisteria is a triumph of craftsmanship and exemplifies the inspirations and ideals that were most important to Louis C. Tiffany.

The conventionalized floral forms and an impressionistic color palette of the Wisteria model highlight the importance of Japanese aesthetics in Tiffany’s glass designs.  Like many of his contemporaries in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries, Tiffany embraced the Japonesque style with great enthusiasm.  The popularity of the wisteria vine motif in traditional Japanese paintings, along with the flower’s rich and diverse colors and forms, made the wisteria blossom the ideal subject to be represented in his leaded glass designs. Tiffany’s high regard for the Wisteria design is evidenced not only by the fact that in 1906 the Wisteria lamp was among the most expensive lamps offered by Tiffany ($400), but also by the fact that Tiffany famously installed a wisteria pergola at his Laurelton Hall estate.

The success of capturing the complexity of the wisteria blossom is owed to Tiffany Studios’ incredible artistry and mastery of their craft.  In the present Wisteria table lamp shade, the dimensionality of the blossoms is rendered through its sensitively composed color palette, which transitions from rich jewel tones of cobalt and ultramarine to softer lilacs.  The resulting effect imparts a strong sense of visual movement suggestive of the layering of blossoms over one another.  Paired with a “Tree Trunk” base as tradition dictates, the elements of this lamp form a unified composition that fulfills Tiffany’s commitment to naturalism in his design works.  The present Wisteria is an extraordinary example of Tiffany’s unparalleled skill as craftsman, colorist, and artist.

Tiffany: Dreaming in Glass

|
New York