396
396
Two porcelain dinner plates and three porcelain soup plates from The Guriev Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St Petersburg, Period of Alexander II (1855-1881)
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT
396
Two porcelain dinner plates and three porcelain soup plates from The Guriev Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St Petersburg, Period of Alexander II (1855-1881)
Estimate
4,0006,000
LOT SOLD. 3,750 GBP
JUMP TO LOT

Details & Cataloguing

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé & Icons

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London

Two porcelain dinner plates and three porcelain soup plates from The Guriev Service, Imperial Porcelain Manufactory, St Petersburg, Period of Alexander II (1855-1881)
the cavettos decorated with swirly gilt rosettes within red ochre and gilt frieze borders, all with green Imperial cyphers of Alexander II
Quantity: 5
diameter of dinner plates 24.3cm, 9 5/8 in.; diameter of soup plates 24cm, 9 1/2 in.
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Catalogue Note

In June 1807 Emperors Napoleon I and Alexander I signed a peace treaty between Russia and France.  Grand gestures of friendship followed.  Among them, Napoleon gave Alexander a service of Sèvres porcelain made in Empire style.  Two years later, Alexander ordered his Imperial Porcelain Manufactory to produce a service to rival the French.  The sculptor and artist Stepan Pimenov (1784-1833) designed what came to be known as the Russian Service, incorporating nationalistic motifs ranging from metropolitan architecture to rural scenes.  By the time the service was finished, Russia had defeated Napoleon in battle.

Count D. A. Guriev (1751-1825) oversaw the Imperial Porcelain Manufactory at the time of production (1809-1816).  A wise manager, he recruited four French artists from Sèvres to work at the Russian factory.  As a result, Guriev’s name was immortalised by an opulent service of Empire-style porcelain intended for the Winter Palace and conceived to serve fifty.  In the second half of the 19th century, it was expanded to include more than 4,500 pieces.  The ornamental gold foliage reflects the glare of empires competing for artistic as well as military glory.

Russian Works of Art, Fabergé & Icons

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London